Human-secreted malaria antibody could usher in an effective, long-term treatment

Not one day too soon!

CRISPR edit makes mosquitoes far less likely to pass malaria

This looks like a better alternative to wiping out mosquitoes at the population level.

Three African countries chosen for the 1st large-scale malaria vaccine pilot program

Hundreds of thousands of infants will be vaccinated against the mosquito-carried parasite.

Scientists engineer mosquitoes that could stop malaria spread

A mosquito with a gene that blocks the malaria parasite has been created in the laboratory, a new research reports.

We now have a malaria vaccine that is up to 100 percent effective

A lifelong dream may have come true. Half a million deaths every year could be averted thanks to this vaccine.

Need to ward off pesky mosquitoes? Sleep with a chicken over your head

Believe it or not, there’s actual scientific proof backing this advice.

Paper strips worth 50 cents accurately diagnose both malaria and cancer

Chemists at the Ohio State University developed a paper strip technology that might save countless lives in rural Africa, and elsewhere where patients have poor access to medical services.

Malaria protein that kills cancer to begin human trials in 2019

Scientists have in the past toyed with the idea of using a disease to fight cancer. Now, after identifying a malaria protein that binds to cancer cells and kills 95% of tumor types, human trials are expected to start within four years. I doesn’t seem like it’s happening fast, but it is, in medical terms. Clinical trials take a lot of

Malaria proteins kill 9 out of 10 cancer cells in mice trials

Researchers stumbled upon a new tool to fight cancer in a rather unexpected place; while searching for a vaccine against malaria in pregnant women, a team of Danish scientists found that, simply put, armed malaria proteins are remarkably good at killing cancer cells. They hope to have a working prototype ready for human trials within four years’ time. Their discovery has been published in the scientific journal Cancer Cell.

2015 Nobel prize for Physiology or Medicine Awarded

This year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine is split into three parts, being divided between William C. Campbell and Satoshi Ōmura — who jointly share a half “for their discoveries concerning a novel therapy against infections caused by roundworm parasites” — and Youyou Tu “for her discoveries concerning a novel therapy against Malaria.”

Drug-Resistant Malaria Could Pose Huge Global Threat

The ability to keep malaria under control is crucial – the disease is highly contagious and the potential health hazards are immense. Efforts have been somewhat successful, with fatalities dropping from over 1 million in 2000 to 584,000 in 2014. But the protozoans that are causing the disease are starting to become immune to the drugs we are using, and that’s a huge problem.

Drug candidate destroys Malaria in 48 hours

Malaria is one of the most common and dangerous diseases in the world, with the World Health Organization estimating over 200 million cases every year. There are several ways to try to treat malaria, but the results are debatable and often times not as effective as desired. Now, a team has demonstrated a new compound which effectively destroys malaria in

Finally, a malaria vaccine may have been discovered

Reporting in PLOS Medicine, researchers found that for every 1000 children who received the vaccine, 800 malaria cases can be prevented. While this is not yet sufficient to eradicate the disease, it is the closest scientists have gotten to a malaria vaccine. Malaria affects millions of people every year throughout the world, claiming just under 1 million lives in 2013

Malaria-carrying mosquitoes manipulated only to breed males, thus wiping whole populations

According to latest estimates by the World Health Organisation, over 3.4 billion people are at risk from contracting malaria and an estimated 627,000 people die each year from the disease. Thanks to the painstaking efforts of leading researchers in the field, however, much progress has been made in curbing down on malaria. Since 2000, increased prevention and control measures have

A 3D view of the malaria sperm

Aside from being really cool and enabling wicked video game graphics, 3D imaging is also extremely useful in research, entering the labs as one of the most powerful tools in the 21st century. Using an imaging technique known as high-speed holographic microscopy, Laurence Wilson, a fellow at Harvard’s Rowland Institute, created detailed 3D images of malaria sperm – the cells

World’s first malaria vaccine on course for 2015

It’s actually happening Good news – encouraging results from the longest and largest trial of a malaria vaccine could see the world’s first anti-malaria jab approved by 2015; malaria is one of the most dangerous diseases in the world, affecting over 220 million people every year (some say 300 million). The vaccine could be used for the first time in

Breakthroughs against malaria: highly effective vaccine developed; meanwhile, anti-malaria soap wins prize

Some 300 million cases of malaria are reported each year in Africa, the continent where the disease is still running rampant. For decades, scientists have been investing immense amounts of energy battling the disease, trying to come up with effective treatments. The recent step forward in the war against malaria  comes from Maryland-based biotech Sanaria, which reportedly has developed an anti-malaria

Mutant mosquitoes lose desire for human scent

Mosquitoes are not only extremely annoying, but they’re some of the most lethal creatures out there, with malaria infecting over 200 million people each year. But genetically modified mosquitoes that lack some of their sense of smell cannot tell humans from other animals and no longer avoid approaching people who are slathered in bug spray. This finding, published in Nature,

Beware of infections in tropical waters – Flood hit areas more vulnerable

Beware of snails before you swim in shallow waters of tropical countries such as India. You can avoid parasitic worm infections caused by the snails, according to a new study. The risk is more in flood hit areas, such as Andhra Pradesh which requires a ground survey to prevent infections which could be detected through urine or stool test. The

Malaria genome sequence shows the disease is more challenging, yet offers opportunities

Two recently released studies by teams of international researchers sequenced the genomes of two major strains of the parasitic disease known as malaria. Their findings show that malaria is a lot more resistant than previously thought, but at the same time helps paint a broader picture which will certain aid in developing more effective treatment, which might one day lead