Meteorites carrying both water and organic compounds point to an ocean world “seeding life” in the universe

Why spread your seed across the Earth when you can spread it across space?

What Curiosity found on Mars are probably just crystals — not fossils

This is likely not our first brush with alien life.

The earliest life forms could be these 3.5-billion-year-old microbes

The amazing discovery suggests that alien life might actually be common.

New evidence indicates that life on Earth emerged almost 4 billion years ago

It’s as old as we can possibly find.

New fossil proves there was life on Earth hundreds of millions of years earlier than we’ve though

Not your everyday find.

All the ingredients for alien life: NASA finds hydrogen spewing out of Saturn’s icy moon, likely propelled from hydro-thermal vents

Both Enceladus and Europa seem capable of supporting alien life, according to a major NASA announcement.

If there’s any life in the Trappist-1 system it’s likely been planet-hopping, scientists say

Nothing like a good ol’ meteorite impact to kickstart life.

Earth-born methanogen bacteria species could survive in Mars’ crust, new study shows

Life can be surprisingly hardy.

Early life kept oxygen in check and stalled evolution for billions of years, model suggests

Evolution doesn’t always procrastinate. But when it does, it’s for 2 billion years.

A whole new branch of life could have evolved and died off on Earth 2,4 billion years ago

There’s no proof. But the conditions were right for it to happen.

Scientists coax bacteria towards silicon-based life

Silly bacteria, carbon-based life is best life!

Martian minerals might bear signatures of ancient life

Findings alien life on barren planet like Mars seems unlikely, but the discovery of the century might that of past life.

Meteorites crashing into early Earth might have supplied all the precious biocompatible phosphorus

Scientists track how a critical chemical element for life got to our planet.

‘Primordial soup’ theory doesn’t hold up, study says. Instead, life might have first emerged elsewhere

New research suggests the “primordial soup” theory can’t explain how living cells evolved to harness energy.

Over-consumption is more deadly to Earth’s wildlife than climate change

We use so much of everything so fast that it’s literally killing the planet.

Chinese scientist finds earliest known fossil of complex life, paper met with heavy criticism

A new discovery may place the first appearance of complex life on Earth a full billion years earlier than previously thought. The scientific community is divided on the value of the find, some hailing it as rock-solid evidence while others dismiss it as inconclusive.

Money can’t buy happiness the saying goes; but it does buy a longer life, Harvard replies

The richest American men may live up to 15 years longer than the poorest ones, and the richest women 10 years more than their poorest counterparts, a new study found.

Biological wheels and motors imaged for the first time

Morgan Beeby and his colleagues at the Imperial College London used electron microscopy to image these biological motors in high resolution and three dimensions for the first time.

If Moore’s law applied to life, then it should be 10bn years old. But the Earth is 4.5bn years old. Hum…

Some researchers have made an interesting connection: if you measure the complexity of life or how big the genome is you find it increases at a rate that seems exponential. It’s very similar to Moore’s law, which suggests the number of transistors over the same surface area on a chip doubles almost every two years. You can extrapolate both forward and background. Eventually, if you extrapolate down enough you’ll find the point of origin. In other words, it’s possible to estimate when life first appeared based on life’s complexity graph.

Glass in Martian craters might hold clues to ancient life

Sampling impact glass from the ancient craters that litter the surface for Mars might prove key to settling a long debate: did Mars ever harbor life? Researchers at NASA believe this is a great lead after the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) currently hovering above the red planet found deposits of glass. These were formed by impacts with large asteroids, whose blast trapped and preserved any matter it came across: dust, soil or any plants or bacteria (if there ever were such things). Cracking open these glass time capsules and peering inside could, thus, be one of the best places to look for.