Researchers capture first ever images of microglia eating brain synapses

Eating for success!

Extra-virgin olive oil might prevent Alzheimer’s and protect your brain

It’s really, really good for you.

Artificial synapse brings us one step closer to brain-like computers

It’s also bio-compatible — are our brains getting an update?

We sleep to forget things, new study finds

Sleep is as mysterious as it is vital for our wellbeing.

Artificial synapse brings us one step closer to building a brain-like computer

Taking a cue from mother nature.

Your memories last as long the neural connections: a long-standing theory now confirmed

Neuroscientists have long posited that memories last as long as the connections in the brain, but putting this theory to test has always proved challenging. Using the latest imaging techniques and sheer innovation, a group at Stanford confirmed this as being true after the researchers literally peered into the brains of mice and studied brain connections as they formed or were replaced. Once the connection was lost, so was the memory.

Long-term memory isn’t stored in synapses, meaning it could be restored even when struck by Alzheimer’s

For a while, the general consensus was that long term memories are stored in synapses. A new  UCLA research topples this paradigm after experiments made on snails suggests that synapses aren’t that crucial storing memories as previously believed, but only facilitate the transfer of information someplace else, most likely in the nucleus of the neurons themselves – though this has yet

Scientists erase memory (and then reactivate it) in rats

Researchers have erased and then reactivated memories in rats, profoundly impacting the animals’ reaction to past events. This is the first study ever to demonstrate the ability to selectively erase and then reactivate a memory by stimulating nerves in the brain at frequencies that strengthen synapses, the connection between neurons. The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind Quite possibly Jim Carrey’s

New transistor boasts neuron-like capabilities. It learns as it computes, hinting towards a new parallel computing future

The human brain is possibly the most complex entity in the Universe. It’s absolutely remarkable and beautiful to contemplate, and the things we are capable of because of our brains are outstanding. Even though most people might seem like they’re using their brains absolutely trivially the truth is the brain is incredibly complex. Let’s look at technicalities alone: the human

Gene mutation leads to insatiable eating disorder causing obesity

There are a number of factors that lead to obesity, the most obvious of which is of course eating too much, without burning the excess fat by exercising. Fact is, there are some people in the world who no matter how much they’d  eat, they never seem to be satisfied, constantly consumed by a sense of hunger and a voracious

The unified theory of brain learning

The brain learns basically by shifting between different strengths of its synapses, as a response to different stimuli – that much is clear. However, recently, a team of UCLA scientists have shattered the common belief about the mechanism of learning, showing that the brain learns rhythmically, and that there is an optimal ‘rhythm’, or frequency, for changing synapse strength. Any

New imaging method reveals stunning methods of brain connections

The typical healthy human brain contains about 200 billion nerve cells, called neurons, all of which are connected through hundreds of trillions of small connections called synapses. One single neuron can lead to up to 10.000 synapses with other neurons, according to Stephen Smith, PhD, professor of molecular and cellular physiology. Along with a team of researchers from the Stanford