Google AI can now look at your retina and predict the risk of heart disease

After analyzing data from over a quarter million patients, the neural network can predict the patient’s age (within a 4-year range), gender, smoking status, blood pressure, body mass index, and risk of cardiovascular disease.

Duo of neural networks get within a pixel of reading our mind and re-creating what’s there

Extremely cool, extremely worrying.

Artificial Intelligence can tell you your blood pressure, age, and smoking status — just by looking at your eye

The eyes can also be a window into a person’s health.

Scientist trains AI to generate Halloween costumes ideas, and some are pretty good

Could AIs be… creative?

Computer chip can mimic human neurons using only beams of light

Just MIT doing a bit of light thinking.

DeepMind can now learn how to use its memories, apply knowledge to new tasks

The AI developed by Alphabet, Google’s parent company, just received a new and powerful update.

Neuroscientists read the mind of a fruit fly

Northwestern University neuroscientists have developed a method that allows them to pinpoint communicating neurons in a living fly’s brain — effectively paving the way for mind-reading. Their mapping of specific neural connection patterns could provide insight into the computational processes that underlie the workings of the human brain.

Neural network image processor tells you what’s going in your pictures

Facial recognition and motion tracking is already old news. The next level is describing what you do or what’s going on – for now only in still pictures. Meet NeuralTalk, a deep learning image processing algorithm developed by Stanford engineers which uses processes similar to those used by the human brain to decipher and interpret photos. The software can easily describe, for instance, a band of people dressed up as zombies. It’s remarkably effective and freaking creepy at the same time.

Google’s AI on LSD: what a robot’s dreams look like

In his book “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep”, one of my favorite writers Philip K. Dick explores what sets apart humans from androids. The theme is more valid today than it ever was, considering the great leaps in artificial intelligence we’re seeing coming off major tech labs around the world, like Google’s. Take for instance how the company employs advanced artificial neural networks to zap through a gazillion images, interpret them and return the right one you’re looking for when you make a query using the search engine. Though nothing like a human brain, the networks uses 10-30 stacked layers of artificial neurons with each layer doing its job in incremental order to come to an “answer” by the final output layer is finished. While not dead-on, the network seems to return results better than anything we’ve seen before and as a by-product, it can also “dream.” These artificial dreams output some fascinating images to say the least, going from virtually nothing (white noise) to something’s that out of a surrealist painting. Who says computers can’t be creative?

Why the brain gets slower as we get older

From a certain age onward, humans seem to process information at a slower pace – learning new things becomes more difficult, remembering where you put the car keys seems to give headaches, and it gets ever worse as we age even more. Neuroscientists at the University of Bristol studying dysfunctional neural communication in Alzheimer patients demonstrated that the number one likely culprit to

CalTech soup displays brainlike behaviour

Researchers from the CalTech University have managed to create the first artificial neural network from DNA, a circuit built out of interactinig molecules that can recall memories based on an incomplete pattern, in pretty much the same way a brain works. “Although brainlike behaviors within artificial biochemical systems have been hypothesized for decades,” says Lulu Qian, a Caltech senior postdoctoral