The science of hangovers or why you feel like crap after a night of heavy drinking

This is actually pretty complicated.

How the brain makes drinking water feel like a pain once you’re hydrated

Drinks for the thirsty, gag reflex for the over-hydrated.

Here’s why your drinking buddies are ruining your liver

When out for drinks, we’re careful not to be the drunkest — beyond that, anything goes.

Getting blackout drunk: how alcohol can leave you with no memory of the night before

Blacking out from alcohol is a bit more complicated than you might think.

How the brain keeps your heat and water balance

What exactly makes you thirsty? Dehydration, obviously, but how does your brain know that your body needs water? And how does that grey, squishy lump resting in your cool and comfortable cranium, know when your body needs to heat up or cool off? Scientists at the McGill University Health Centre Research Institute (RI-MUHC) and Duke University have asked themselves just that, and being scientists, went ahead to find out.

Legal, but not safe: small distractions make driving drunk lethal

Even though driving after drinking small amounts is legal, it’s most definitely not safe, research from the University of Kentucky (UK) in the U.S. finds. Nicholas van Dyke and Mark Fillmore at UK reported that for intoxicated drivers, even those driving under the legally accepted alcohol limit, small distractions such as a text message or dashboard controls are just too much to handle safely. The study provides the first scientific evidence on the impact such distractions have on the ability of liquored drivers to safely control vehicles.

Ballantine creates whiskey glass to be used in zero G, spill free

Scottish manufacturer Ballantines comes to the aid of space-dwellers the world round (and beyond) with a new, high-tech glass that promises to make getting hammered with style in space a reality.

Heavy drinkers may get extra “brain fuel” from alcohol

When a lion hunts a gazelle, he is actually hunting the weakest of the herd, the one which is the slowest. Repeating the hunt, in time only strengthens the herd. The drunken version of this is that the same things happen with alcohol and neurons: sure, alcohol destroys some neurons, but it’s only the weaker ones, and the remaining ones

Teen drinking linked to Internet use

According to a recently published study, teens who regularly drink alcohol tend to spend more time on a computer surfing the internet on social networking sites, than other teens who don’t drink alcohol. As a conclusion that both somewhat bashes ‘nowadays teens’ and the Internet, the study concludes that a link between teenage drinking and Internet exists. Though it isn’t