Venomous creatures could hold the key to innovative drug therapies

Specific substances from venom could be useful in devising new treatments.

Chinese centipede can kill prey 15 times bigger than itself — but at least now we have an antidote

Scientists finally discover how centipede venom works and find an antidote.

Fanged blenny ‘heroin’-like venom could be the next super-painkiller

Tiny fish, big fangs, huge possibilities.

How cobras developed their devastating flesh-eating venom

The cobra developed a crippling venom — and it wanted the world to know.

A snake with the largest venom glands and known as the ‘killer of killers’ might help us make the best painkillers

You often have to look in peculiar (and dangerous) places for innovation.

New paper finds WO virus has stolen the Black Widow’s venom gene

One of the most successful bacteria species on Earth is now hunted by venom-wielding-viruses.

First species of venomous frog found in Brazil

The first venomous (yes, venomous Рnot poisonous) frog was discovered in Brazil by mistake. A frog head-butted Carlos Jared in the hand, and after a while he started feeling a strange pain; it took him a while to connect the dots and realize that the frog was responsible for the pain he was feeling and decided to find out what

New painkillers could be made out of the venom of a killer snail

Cone snails have one of the most dangerous venom in the animal kingdom. This complex venomous soup is made up of thousands of chemicals used both to hunt prey and ward off predators. The venom is enough to kill a human in a matter of minutes. Now, these lethal chemicals could be used to create a new class of painkiller for chronic pain and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, according to University of Queensland researchers. The same team also used a genetic and proteomic to find out how the cone snails developed its venom. Apparently, the animals initially used their chemical weaponry as a defense mechanism and later on adapted it into an attack.

Antivenom: how it’s made and why it’s so precious

Some 100,000 people die each year from venomous snakes bites. Most die because there’s not enough antivenom.

A component from scorpion and honeybee venom stops cancer growth

The difference between a poison and a cure is the dosage – and this could be very well said about this approach. Bio-engineers report that peptides in some venoms bind to cancer cells and block tumor growth and spread and could be effectively used to fight cancer – the only problem is they might also harm healthy cells. Bioengineer Dipanjan

Black mamba venom – more effective than morphine

I know this sounds much like a joke, how black mamba venom can really ease you of your pain – but it’s not. A painkiller just as effective as black mamba venom but without the unwanted side effects has been found by French researchers in the venom. The predator, like many other snakes, uses neurotoxins to paralyze and kill small

Bee venom could be used to detect explosives and pesticides

A remarkable MIT research has found that by coating carbon nano-tubes with bee venom they can create incredibly faithful sensor detectors for explosives,  such as TNT, as well as at least two different types of pesticides. The find came after MIT chemists, lead by Michael Strano, coated one-atom-thick tubes of carbon with protein fragments found in bee venom saw that

Octopus with venom that works in freezing temperatures discovered

Boy, you just can’t have enough octopus, that’s for sure – they’re really amazing creatures, that often surprise us. Now, a venomous octopus living in the frozen waters of Antarctica is definitely awesome, but how is this useful? Well, according to Bryan Fry, of the University of Melbourne, it is. He and his team have been studying how evolution changed

The deadliest creature in the world

So, microorganisms and other humans aside, what do you think is the deadliest creature in animal kingdom? A snake, perhaps a lion or bear, a scorpion perhaps? Neah, not even close. The deadliest creature in the world is actually called a sea wasp. Specialists use the term ‘deadliest’ when they refer to venomous creatures, that produce toxins that can be

Komodo dragons are venomous

The Komodo dragon is definitely one of the most impressive and dangerous creatures to roam the Earth. Reaching 3 metres and more than 70 kilos and delivering one of the most fatal bites in the reptilian world, it’s no wonder that it inspired so many legends and fears. However, it does not all end here: it seems that this modern