Researchers develop octopus skin-inspired infrared camouflage

The advancement could help hide objects from heat sensors.

Self-healing and fully recyclable electronic skin will help robots feel touch

It’s not perfect but we’re getting there.

Augmented Reality could soon help surgeons ‘see’ through the skin

From Pokemon Go to the operating room.

Extremely high doses of vitamin D help with sunburns, reduce inflammation, heal skin cells

By ‘extremely high’ I mean 100-500 times the daily recommended dose.

Mussel-glue-and-protein balm could spell the end of scars forever

Sadly, not very effective against emotional scars.

Skin impression of one of the last dinosaurs found in Spain

Some 60 million years ago, one dinosaur laid down to rest — creating something unique in the whole of Europe.

We’ve found the genetic key to making red blood cells

Researchers from Lund University in Sweden and the Center of Regenerative Medicine in Barcelona have identified four sequences of genetic code that can reprogram mice skin cells to produce red blood cells. If this method can be used on human tissues, it would provide a reliable source of blood for transfusions and people with anemia.

Scientists create artificial skin that sprouts new hairs and sweats

Creating artificial skin may sound weird, but it can be extremely useful (or even life saving) for people who suffered from burns or any type of similar accident; it is also useful for testing drugs or cosmetic products. Skin transplants are a growing need, and many teams from across the world hope to one day be able to create artificial

Stretchable artificial skin might make robots more human, and vice-versa

An artificial ‘skin’ can stretch up to 480 percent its original size, and can sense changes in pressure – a haptic feature that could lend both robots and human prostheses a sense of touch.

Why getting a tattoo hurts — the science behind inking

Humans have tattooed themselves since times immemorial to celebrate gods, show social standing, for medicinal purposes or just to look good. And since the dawn of this controversial form of art, people have endured excruciating pain to adorn their body with ink; but why does tattooing hurt so much?

Dangerous or not? Scientists uncover the connection between skin moles and melanoma

There is a long-lasting debate dividing the cancer researchers community over the point at which a skin lesion is considered a melanoma. A University of California-San Francisco team led by Hunter Shain might have found the answers to settle the debate once and for all; they have found a way to tell whether a lesion is harmless or growing into a melanoma.

90 percent of skin viruses are completely unknown

Just like an ecosystem inhabits an area, so to is your skin inhabited by a swarm of micro-organisms – including viruses.

Artificial skin can feel pressure, then tell your brain about it

Prosthetics has come a long way from its humble beginnings – the crude wooden legs of yore are a far cry from the technological marvels we can create to replace our limbs today. However, there is one thing that, with all our know-how, we haven’t yet been able to incorporate in them: a sense of touch. A research team from Stanford University aims to fix this shortcoming, and has developed technology that can “feel” when force is exerted upon it, then transmit the sensory data to brain cells – in essence, they’ve created an artificial skin.

Tattoos can cause severe adverse reactions in the skin 1 out of 10 times

One in four people in the US has a tattoo, and if you’re part of this statistic you know how painful getting one can be. The problem is that, like the tattoo itself, that pain lasts and in some cases the adverse reactions caused by the foreign body, i.e. the dye, can endure for months and months at a time. This isn’t something new per se, but what’s surprising is how frequent this happens. Researchers at New York University asked 300 or so people in Central Park if they had a tattoo and whether they experienced anything out of the ordinary following the procedure, like redness and scarring. Almost 10% confirmed they had developed abnormal reactions. Of these 6% had itching, scaly skin and swelling , and 4% claimed they went through pain, itching and infection and these didn’t stop for at least four months.

Scientists find “punk” shape shifting frog

For the first time, researchers have discovered a vertebrate able to change the texture of its skin from smooth to spiny. The new frog species was found in Ecuador in the plentiful moss surrounding the native forest.

The skin gets damaged by UV light even in the dark, ironically as it may seem

Contrary to popular belief, much of the damage inflicted to the skin by harmful ultraviolet (UV) light occurs hours after exposure to the sun, even when you’re sitting comfortably asleep in your dark bedroom. The Yale University research also made a startling find: melanin – the pigment that gives human skin and hair its colour – has both carcinogenic and protective effects. This double standard should be taken into consideration from now on when discussing UV exposure, but also when looking for new treatments to skin cancers like melanoma.

The Power of Water: Are you drinking enough?

  Water makes up the major fluid supporting our bodily systems and is important to your overall health. Drinking water improves your complexion, feeds your hair, hydrates your vision, and so much more. Throughout the day you lose hydration through sweat, urine, stool, breathing, and caloric metabolism. Those losses are accelerated in warmer climates, during exercise, at high altitudes, and

Skin-like material that stretches and senses might bring the tactile to the artificial

In the new mobile information age where smartphones have become an ever common part of our lives, there seems to be a dominant trend which tends to incorporate interactive touch screen capabilities to more and more consumer electronics. It’s pretty clear that our electronics are getting smarter day by day – I, for one, am still waiting for the next