Chernobyl is transforming into a massive solar plant — and it’s almost done

There’s some poetic justice in having Chernobyl once again produce energy — but this time, from the Sun.

Radioactive boars spark concern in Sweden

Boars will be boars — radioactive or not.

China is building a huge solar plant at Chernobyl

When one door closes, another one opens.

New high-tech shelter reminds us that Chernobyl is still deadly, thirty years after the meltdown

The new one is much better than the last one though.

Chernobyl is to become the world’s largest solar power plant

This huge area will finally produce energy — 30 years after the meltdown.

Truffles found to be surprisingly resistant to radioactivity

Plants and mushrooms growing sometimes accumulate dangerous levels of radioactivity. But until now, this hasn’t been confirmed for truffles, and researchers wanted to see whether truffles too accumulate radioactive material – the results were quite surprising. The Chernobyl accident was a catastrophic nuclear accident that occurred on 26 April 1986 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in the town of

Wildlife flourishes in Chernobyl’s post-apocalyptic exclusion zone

In the wake of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant explosion in 1987, hundreds of thousand had to move immediately without notice. Their lives changed forever. Many didn’t have time to pack anything, as documented by the ghost towns around the fallout site still littered with toys, valuable items and other personal belongings. But while humans had much to suffer, the same can’t be said about the wildlife. In the almost four decades since the dramatic disaster, wildlife and vegetation has simply sprung to life like never before. In some instances, there are more wildlife per square meter than in some of the busiest protected natural parks in neighboring Belarus. Turns out wildlife doesn’t mind that much radiation – what they mind is humans.

A haunting view of Chernobyl, captured by aerial drones

For a 60 Minutes report that aired earlier this month, filmmaker Danny Cooke spent a week exploring abandoned cities Chernobyl and nearby Pripyat. Pripyat was just preparing to open a new amusement park just days before the nuclear meltdown happened at Chernobyl. Now, Cooke has posted a a compilation entitled “Postcards from Pripyat, Chernobyl” — a mix of drone footage and

Trees in Chernobyl aren’t dying and this is a problem

Some thirty years after Chernobyl’s nuclear plant meltdown that caused an international incident, scientists have yet to assess the full blown damage the radioactive disaster has caused. While the rest of the world has moved on, ever since the disaster the area surrounding the former nuclear plant has remained largely unchanged, even the plants and trees there seem to have

Engineers try to seal Chernobyl with a giant arch

Chernobyl is still one of the most radioactive places on the face of the Earth, and authorities are working on a huge program to reduce any further risks of contamination. Work began in recent days to remove, bit by bit, the giant chimney protruding from the Chernobyl nuclear power station. The Chernobyl disaster was a catastrophic nuclear accident that occurred

Particle accelerator can transmute radioactive waste and drastically lower half-life decay

In the wake of the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster, and as always Chernobyl, as anti-nuclear manifestos are quick to remind every time nuclear powered energy is concerned, there seems to be a sort of stigma applied to nuclear power. Countries are revising their policies –  some for the better, being long overdue, while other simply limit nuclear power rather

Chernnobyl fungus feeds on nuclear radiation

You know Chernobyl, right? The place of the biggest nuclear accident in the world? The place is so radioactive nobody lives in the vicinity anymore, and nearby plants are suffering major amounts of radiation. However, not everybody is sad about this event; a type of fungi (mushrooms) possess an ability beyond imagination: they can take the lethal radiation and use

Japan raises nuclear crisis level to that of Chernobyl

Japan’s nuclear crisis level has been regulated from level 5 to 7  by the International Atomic Energy Agency, at the top of the nuclear hazard scale and right on par with the 1986 Chernobyl incident, according to the level of radiation released in the accident. The new ranking signifies a “major accident” with “wider consequences” than the previous level, according