The Universe expands much faster than we thought, and current models can’t explain why

Scientists have completed the most precise measurement of the Universe’s rate of expansion to date; but the result just isn’t compatible with speed calculations from remanent Big Bang radiation. Should the former results be confirmed by independent techniques, we might very well have to rewrite the laws of cosmology as we know them.

Consciousness comes in “slices” roughly 400 milliseconds long

This is the first time a two-stage model has been proposed for how consciousness arises, and it offers a more complete picture than the purely continuous or discrete models. It also provides useful insight into the the way our brain processes time and relates it to our perception of the world.

Study finds six components needed for a genuine apology

There are six components that make or break an apology, a new study finds. Depending on many of these you include, your feelings of regret will either be accepted or get a cold shoulder.

Money can’t buy happiness the saying goes; but it does buy a longer life, Harvard replies

The richest American men may live up to 15 years longer than the poorest ones, and the richest women 10 years more than their poorest counterparts, a new study found.

Researchers find hundreds of methane leaks at well pads in nation-wide thermal imaging study

The Environmental Defense Fund’s Oil and Gas program has released a new nation-wide report of the most common sites of methane leaks at oil and gas pads. Surprisingly, most of the leaks were traced back to faulty piping, vents or doors on gas tanks in newer, not older, wells.

New class of star-stripped super-Earths discovered

Astrophysicists have discovered a new class of exoplanets whose atmospheres and volatile elements have been blown away by the star they’re orbiting. Their findings help cover a previously uncharted gap in planetary populations, and offers valuable insight for locating new worlds to colonize.

Would you be willing to take an electric shock in the name of curiosity? Science says yes, several actually

Curiosity is probably the single most powerful force behind our species’ scientific discoveries. It can drive us to explore and discover even if the outcome might be painful or harmful. But this need to discover and learn can also become a curse; a new study found that people are willing to face unpleasant outcomes with no apparent benefits just to sate their curiosity.

Sugar addiction could be treated with the same drugs we use for nicotine addiction

People frequently overindulge, sometimes to the point of developing sugar addictions. There has been a lot of interest in the pharmaceutical industry in finding treatments that can combat this effect, with little results up to now. But, a world-first study led by QUT might change that.

People pick up and use discarded USB drives they find almost half the time

Portable data storage, such as USB drives, might not be quite as useful or sought after as they once were but they remain an undeniably handy method to carry your data around.

Composite metal foam better at stopping bullets than solid plates

Composite metal foam (CMF) is light, but strong — it can even stop bullets!

White Nose Bat Syndrome spreads deeper into the U.S. — first case confirmed west of the Rockies

The first case of white nose syndrome, a disease that has wreaked havoc on bat populations in the eastern U.S. has been identified west of the Rockies. The disease’s spread threatens to drastically impact bat populations there, altering ecosystems throughout the country.

NASA plans to make airplanes cleaner and 50% more fuel efficient by reviving the wing truss

NASA plans to improve today’s planes with a blast from the past — re-implementing a structure known as a wing truss would reduce fuel consumption and carbon emissions of common commercial aircraft by as much as 50%, according to computational models.

NOAA photographs golden retrievers swimming back home from their mating run

NOAA has released a photograph of this year’s golden retriever migration. The animals are returning to shore after their mating run, where a new generation of puppies will be born.

Researchers on the hunt for students’ junk-food-gene

Takeout, instant noodles and cheap beer — the only known organisms able to survive solely on these three items are university students. A new study examined undergraduates’ dietary habits to see what powers their resilience to low-quality food, and if this trait can be grafted into human beings.

The “war on drugs” has only harmed human rights and public health — not supply and demand

A new report questions the legitimacy of today’s “War on Drugs,” seeing as the five-decade long process has failed to reduce either the supply or demand for narcotics. The authors urge for ‘scientifically grounded’ policies to be implemented, including regulated markets for cannabis.

The cake isn’t a lie — but the nutritional value on the box definitely is

Food packaging does influence the amount of calories consumed, a new study found. By showing portion sizes much larger than recommended, the pictures on various product’s packaging could make it difficult to eat healthy. Extras such as toppings or frosting on cakes are also usually not taken into account on nutritional labels, exacerbating the problem.

KTH researchers develop transparent wood for use in building and solar panels

Wood, one of the cheapest and most widely used construction materials humanity has ever employed, has just had its range of uses expanded; Researchers at Stockholm’s KTH Royal Institute of Technology have developed a method of turning wood transparent that’s suitable for mass production.

Yorkshire’s endangered Amir tigers cubs celebrate their first birthday

Yorkshire Wildlife Park celebrated their youngest trio of Amur tigers’ first birthday in style on Tuesday. Hector, Harley and Hope were filmed on their journey from adorable cubs to adorable ferocious predators and, to mark the landmark occasion, the park released an adorable video showcasing how they’ve grown.

India’s Bakey edible spoon does two of my favorite things: limits dishes and plastic waste

India-based company Bakeys has started producing edible spoons to try and fight world-wide plastic waste from disposable cutlery. Not only eco-friendly, but also delicious!

New plasma printing technique can deposit nanomaterials on flexible, 3D substrates

A new nanomaterial printing method could make it both easier and cheaper to create devices such as wearable chemical and biological sensors, data storage and integrated circuits — even on flexible surfaces such as paper or cloth. The secret? Plamsa.