Your smartphone can help Stephen Hawking discover alien life

This week space fanatics were teeming with excitement after it was announced that Stephen Hawking had teamed up with Russian billionaire Yuri Milner in a quest to find extraterrestrial life.

Grab a glass and pour a drink, there’s ice a-plenty: Arctic sea ice on the rebound

As the climate changes and temperatures keep growing, you’d assume that polar ice coverage would be shrinking. Not so says a new study by Time that shows how Arctic sea ice volume grew by more than a quarter after the summers of 2013 and 2014.

In God we Trust: but other people don’t, really. Let’s look at religions

What drives us to create these intricate systems of tales, beliefs and myths, who starts them and why do they propagate? Is it just the need to explain the unexplainable? Is there a deeper need for order nestled in our brain that makes us pin rain and drought, life and death on some higher, but purposeful, being?

I don’t know. But what i can show you is what we know about how religion appeared, spread, and thought us up till today.

14,000-year-old molar gives us oldest proof of dentistry, and will make you love your dentist’s drill

Just as today -or a little less often, as we tend to abuse our teeth quite a bit nowadyas – early humans had to deal with cavities. An infected 14,000 year old molar may give us a glimpse into how they treated such afflictions, and is the oldest known evidence of dentistry.

New Horizons images of Pluto hold big surprises for scientists

The soaring ice mountains of Pluto are accompanied by wide plains and mysterious deep troughs, show photographs received from NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft.

Tiny fluffy sea slugs have Japan’s netizens going crazy, and they’ll give you our cute-dose for the day

Japan’s Twittersphere has just rediscovered (and is loosing its collective mind over) what is probably the cutest sea slug ever – Jorunna parva, a sea slug that looks like a fluffy bunny.

Science delivers: new seaweed tastes like bacon, healthier than kale

The unexpectedly delicious new creation is actually a new strain of red marine algae named dulse. It’s packed full of minerals and proteins, it’s low in calories, and it looks a bit like red lettuce. The team claims it’s better for you than kale!

Pluto’s so yesterday! New Horizons buckles up to study the Kuiper Belt

It is similar to the asteroid belt, in that it contains many small bodies, all remnants from the Solar System’s formation. But unlike the Asteroid Belt, it is much larger – 20 times as wide and 20 to 200 times as massive. In order to catch a better glimpse of these remote leftovers from the birth of the solar system, NASA places its hopes in the success of the New Horizons mission.

New carbon capture technologies promise to remedy climate change

Three startups – Carbon Engineering, Global Thermostat and Climeworks – are making machines capable of managing the buildup of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The new devices literally suck carbon dioxide out of the air.

Gene therapy restores hearing in deaf mice, paving the way for human treatment

Mice with genetic hearing loss could sense and respond to noises after receiving working copies of their faulty genes, researchers report. Because the mice’s mutated genes closely correspond to those responsible for some hereditary human deafness, the scientists hope the results will inform future human therapies.

Pentaquark particle discovered by CERN scientists

After taking a short break in activity to be upgraded, the biggest atom smasher currently in use, CERN’s Large Hadron Collider came back in business, and it did so with a bang. Using it, researchers have discovered yet another new kind of particle dubbed “pentaquarks” -that amounts to a new form of matter.

Bumblebees in Europe and North America bumble away from the equator as habitats shrink due to climate change

In the most comprehensive study ever conducted of the impacts of climate change on critical pollinators, scientists have discovered that global warming is rapidly shrinking the area where these bees are found in both North America and Europe.

Amazing 1930 map of “Herbal Cures”

Slate just reported on this amazing map of ‘Herbal Cures’ from 1932 of the medicinal plants in common use among pharmacists and the public back then.

Exxon had evidence of climate change since 1981 – funded deniers for 27 years

An email recently unearthed by one of the their own scientists casts the blame on ExxonMobil, the world’s largest oil company in the world, as they had data pertaining to climate change as early as 1981 – seven years before it became public issue. They chose to fund deniers of the problem for the next 27 years.

Suidobashi Heavy Industries accepts US’s Megabot Inc challenge for a giant robot duel

Earlier this month, Megabots Inc issued a video challenge on Youtube to Suidobashi Heavy Industries, to pit the company’s’ biggest, baddest robots against each other in a duel of giant robots. And grab the popcorn, put the beer on ice and get your geek on, because Japanese robot manufacturer has accepted the challenge from its US competitor, Efe news agency reported.

The great Pan-Pacific Robot Duel

USA’s MegaBots Inc issued a challenge to Suidobashi Heavy Industry, Japanese robotics manufacturer, to a giant, epic, ROBOT DUEL (hype intensifies).

So you’ve come face to face with a bear; what should you do to bear through this?

A Montana family came perilously close to a grizzly bear near Yellowstone Park in the US when it jumped on the hood of their car. The family stayed in their car, kept the windows closed, and eventually the bear got bored and wandered off. But what happens if you don’t have the safety of a vehicle?

Rosetta spacecraft finds huge sinkholes on comet’s surface

Rosetta is a robotic space probe built and launched by the European Space Agency. Along with Philae, its lander module, the craft is performing a detailed study of comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. The probe usually orbits 67P at a distance of a few hundred kilometers. Footage received from Rosetta over the last year showed a number of dust jets coming from the comet,

The Great Barrier Reef left out of UNESCO “in danger” list, environmental group films turtle-back video to raise awareness of the area’s fragility

The Great Barrier Reef, which stretches 2,000km (1,200 miles) along the coast, is the world’s largest living ecosystem. Environmental groups are pushing to get the reef listed as “in danger” by the UNESCO, so that the Australian government would have to work harder to protect it from various dangers such as pollution, dredging, fishing and so on. The UN says this

Check yourself (grammar wise) before you wreck yourself!

The Grammar Police can breathe a sigh of relief as the guys over at Pop Chart Lab have put together a poster to help them fight un-grammarness everywhere.