Hope you’re all not too bored by the influx of Curiosity we’ve been feeding these past few days. We believe this to be one of the most significant scientific events of the year, topped maybe just by the discovery of the Higgs boson, and as such the rover’s landing on martian soil deserves at least a decent amount of coverage that we can offer.

The well deserved hype began on Sunday night once with Curiosity’s flawless touchdown with the red planet’s surface. Since then, we reported on the rover’s first images beamed back to scientists at  the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California, showcased a video which documents the rovers descent, filmed by the mobile Mars laboratory itself, featured a photo of the rover hanging by a parachute and now we’re presented with even more goodies, courtesy of NASA.

This image released on Tuesday Aug. 7,2012 by NASA shows the first color view of the north wall and rim of Gale Crater where NASA's rover Curiosity landed Sunday night. The picture was taken by the rover's camera at the end of its stowed robotic arm and appears fuzzy because of dust on the camera's cover. (AP Photo/NASA)

This image released on Tuesday Aug. 7,2012 by NASA shows the first color view of the north wall and rim of Gale Crater where NASA’s rover Curiosity landed Sunday night. The picture was taken by the rover’s camera at the end of its stowed robotic arm and appears fuzzy because of dust on the camera’s cover. Click on image for larger view.(AP Photo/NASA)

Subscribe to our newsletter and receive our new book for FREE
Join 50,000+ subscribers vaccinated against pseudoscience
Download NOW
By subscribing you agree to our Privacy Policy. Give it a try, you can unsubscribe anytime.

The most interesting Curiosity news for today is its first color image from Mars, which is still rather grainy, but a notable upgrade from the black and whites. In the image one can see the north wall and rim of Gale Crater, a vast basin where the nuclear-powered, six-wheeled rover touched down Sunday night after flying through space for more than eight months. The photo was taken by Curiosity’s Mars Hand Lens Imager, or MAHLI, one of the rover’s key instruments, affixed to the end of its robotic arm.

It’ll be several weeks before it takes its first drive and flexes its robotic arm. Since landing, engineers have been busy performing health checkups on its systems and instruments. Stay tuned, however, since in the next couple of days Curiosity will be sending even more color images which will be patched together for an awesome  360-degree color panorama.