National Geographic invites photographers from around the world to enter the 2015 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest – but hurry up, the final submission date is 30 June! Eligible contestants can visit natgeo.com/travelerphotocontest to submit photographs in any or all of four categories: Travel Portraits; Outdoor Scenes; Sense of Place; and Spontaneous Moments. The entry fee is $15 (USD) per photo, but the grand-prize winner will receive an eight-day National Geographic Photo Expedition to Costa Rica and the Panama Canal for two. But you can enjoy the contest without participating – here are some of the most spectacular entries (more here and here):

Photo and caption by Marja Schwartz /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestLion cub jumping on mother’s head, Naboisho Conservancy, Masai Mara, Kenya, Africa

Photo and caption by Marja Schwartz /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestLion cub jumping on mother’s head, Naboisho Conservancy, Masai Mara, Kenya, Africa

Photo and caption by David Menaker /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestWhile touring the waterways along the Antarctic Peninsula, we saw two Adelie Penguins watching their surroundings from the top of an Iceberg

Photo and caption by David Menaker /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestWhile touring the waterways along the Antarctic Peninsula, we saw two Adelie Penguins watching their surroundings from the top of an Iceberg

Photo and caption by James Smart /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestBeautiful tornado tracks in open farm land narrowly missing a home near Simla, Colorado.

Photo and caption by James Smart /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestBeautiful tornado tracks in open farm land narrowly missing a home near Simla, Colorado.

Photo and caption by Peter Gedei /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestThe famous hall "Halle der Circe" is located at the end of the highest-lying touristic cave in the world (2100 m alt.), which can be reached only by experienced cavers. With proper lighting the permanent ice in the hall shines in beautiful blue tones, which add enchantment atmosphere to the frozen hall.

Photo and caption by Peter Gedei /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestThe famous hall “Halle der Circe” is located at the end of the highest-lying touristic cave in the world (2100 m alt.), which can be reached only by experienced cavers. With proper lighting the permanent ice in the hall shines in beautiful blue tones, which add enchantment atmosphere to the frozen hall.

Photo and caption by Jassen T. /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestSunrise at Grand Prismatic Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. Aerial Image. If you look carefully, you might notice the person enjoying this natural beauty.

Photo and caption by Jassen T. /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestSunrise at Grand Prismatic Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. Aerial Image. If you look carefully, you might notice the person enjoying this natural beauty.

Photo and caption by Eduardo Minte Hess /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestI was working at my family farm some 150 km from the Calbuco Volcano when a friend called me and told me what was happening, I took my camera and tripod and drove to Puerto Varas where a quiet chaos was ensuing and decided to keep on driving to darker area. Upon arrival the  volcano was quiet again, not even vapour coming out so a little disapointed I went to rest. Two hours later hell broke loose and I could take some of the pictures I was dreaming about ever since Chaiten eruption in 2008.

Photo and caption by Eduardo Minte Hess /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestI was working at my family farm some 150 km from the Calbuco Volcano when a friend called me and told me what was happening, I took my camera and tripod and drove to Puerto Varas where a quiet chaos was ensuing and decided to keep on driving to darker area. Upon arrival the
volcano was quiet again, not even vapour coming out so a little disapointed I went to rest. Two hours later hell broke loose and I could take some of the pictures I was dreaming about ever since Chaiten eruption in 2008.

 

Photo and caption byPoorna Kedar /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestWhile foraging for food, sometimes Greater Flamingos get into mild altercation with their neighbours. This is one such moment when these two big guys bumped into each other. And when this happens, they both stand tall and bite each other's beak and continue to do what they were doing. While this is clearly a fight, the way they do this appears to be a romantic moment.

Photo and caption byPoorna Kedar /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestWhile foraging for food, sometimes Greater Flamingos get into mild altercation with their neighbours. This is one such moment when these two big guys bumped into each other. And when this happens, they both stand tall and bite each other’s beak and continue to do what they were doing. While this is clearly a fight, the way they do this appears to be a romantic moment.

 

Photo and caption byYosuke Kashiwakura /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestThe island of Borneo, which is split between the countries of Malaysia, Indonesia, and Brunei, was once covered with a lush tropical rainforest, but in the wake of ongoing deforestation and the expansion of plantation farming, the habitats of the islandÕs endemic and endangered species are being destroyed rapidly. Relentless deforestation has precipitated the loss of 90% of the orangutan population in 100 years. At this rate, some expect this species to become extinct within the next 20 years.

Photo and caption byYosuke Kashiwakura /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestThe island of Borneo, which is split between the countries of Malaysia, Indonesia, and Brunei, was once covered with a lush tropical rainforest, but in the wake of ongoing deforestation and the expansion of plantation farming, the habitats of the islandÕs endemic and endangered species are being destroyed rapidly. Relentless deforestation has precipitated the loss of 90% of the orangutan population in 100 years. At this rate, some expect this species to become extinct within the next 20 years.

Photo and caption by Bonnie Stewart /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestThe little tarsier, nicely nestled in a leaf, suddenly opens its eyes!  They are nocturnal so what a surprise.  These tiny primates (3 to 6 inches) are found only in the Philippines and most of them are in sanctuaries.  This one was in a sanctuary in Bohol Island.

Photo and caption by Bonnie Stewart /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestThe little tarsier, nicely nestled in a leaf, suddenly opens its eyes! They are nocturnal so what a surprise. These tiny primates (3 to 6 inches) are found only in the Philippines and most of them are in sanctuaries. This one was in a sanctuary in Bohol Island.

 

Photo and caption by Christopher R Gray /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestI visited Deadvlei in 2008. The personal emotional and spiritual connection I felt with "The Beginning" I know I had to return someday.  That time came in May of 2015.  I knew I had to make a photograph that reflected how I felt during my first visit and on this visit.  I did capture it.  I fell it was not just a sense of place but a sense of time.

Photo and caption by Christopher R Gray /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestI visited Deadvlei in 2008. The personal emotional and spiritual connection I felt with “The Beginning” I know I had to return someday. That time came in May of 2015. I knew I had to make a photograph that reflected how I felt during my first visit and on this visit. I did capture it. I fell it was not just a sense of place but a sense of time.

Photo and caption by Marc Henauer /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestEvery year, humpback whales come to Kingdom of Tonga during July to September. The mothers raise their babies and when they are enough strong they go far away to the cold water. During whale watching activity, you can live some incredible experiences by interaction with this fabulous mammal. This young calf played with me during 30 minutes under the control of his mother, a great memory!

Photo and caption by Marc Henauer /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestEvery year, humpback whales come to Kingdom of Tonga during July to September. The mothers raise their babies and when they are enough strong they go far away to the cold water. During whale watching activity, you can live some incredible experiences by interaction with this fabulous mammal. This young calf played with me during 30 minutes under the control of his mother, a great memory!

Photo and caption by Hamish Mitchell /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestCaptured in Kruger National Park in South Africa, this lion was one of four coalition males that had made an elephant kill during the night. For four days they fed on their prey, and this beautiful male was ready for a nap after filling his belly.

Photo and caption by Hamish Mitchell /National Geographic Traveler Photo ContestCaptured in Kruger National Park in South Africa, this lion was one of four coalition males that had made an elephant kill during the night. For four days they fed on their prey, and this beautiful male was ready for a nap after filling his belly.

 

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