Materials, Nanotechnology, News

Scientists predict the existence of a liquid analogue of graphene

Atomically thin two-dimensional liquid. Image credit: Pekka Koskinen.

By now, we’ve all hopefully at least heard of graphene, the new wonder material that promises to revolutionize a swarm of applications. But now, a team of researchers from Finland have predicted the existence of atomically thin, free-standing 2D liquid phase – a liquid analogue of graphene.

Mind & Brain, Nanotechnology, News

Scientists create neural lace that fuses with your brain

The rolled electronic mesh is injected through a glass needle into a water-based solution. (Lieber Research Group, Harvard University)

In a world where in only a few decades we moved from clunky phones to wireless satellite-connected devices that allow you to be anywhere and do anything on the internet, it seems only normal that scientists will take it to the next level – to your brain. Already tested on mice, this fine mesh fits inside a syringe and unfurls on the brain to monitor its activity.

Inventions, Nanotechnology, News

Gold Nanospirals Might Protect Your Identity

World's smallest spirals could guard against identity theft | Research News @ Vanderbilt

Microscopic swirls from gold might be the key to protect your cash and credit cards in the future, making identity theft virtually impossible. Researchers at Vanderbilt University developed the “Archimedes spirals” and report that they produce four times more blue light per unit volume than currently existing frequency amplifiers; they could be printed on currency, ID cards and pretty much everything that’s important to prevent counterfeiting.

Health & Medicine, Inventions, Nanotechnology, News

Nanotech toothbrush means you never need toothpaste again

misoka_17

It’s common sense – in order to brush your teeth, you need water, a toothbrush, and toothpaste. Well, a company from Japan wants to change all that: they’ve developed a nanotechnology toothbrush that basically eliminates the need for toothpaste.

Nanotechnology, News, Technology

Artificial leaf breakthrough makes solar fuels one step closer

artificial-leaf-cc543

A team at Caltech has devised a new film coating that facilitates catalysis and electron transfer in a solar powered system that splits water into hydrogen and oxygen, which can be used as fuels. Such a system is also called an artificial leaf or solar-fuel generator because in many ways it mimics the process which plants use to convert sunlight and CO2 into oxygen and fuel (sugars, carbohydrates). The researchers make note, however, that they’re still a long way from making it commercial viable, but these sort of updates are inspiring.

Nanotechnology, News

Laser-etching pattern turns any metal into a super-hydrophobic surface

Super hydrophobic surface

A new generation of water-repellent products could be just ahead after researchers at University of Rochester demonstrated an amazing laser technique that etches tiny micro and nano grooves into a metal surface making it super-hydrophobic.

Nanotechnology, News, Technology

Superconductive nanowire hybrid fuses semiconductor and metal with atomic precision

Thomas Sand Jespersen and Peter Krogstrup, here seen in the laboratorie at the Center for Quantum Devices, Niels Bohr Institute, where the research in nanowire crystals are taking place. The nanowire crystals may lie the foundation for future electronics, such as quantum computation and solar cells. Credit: University of Copenhaga

A novel type of nanowire crystals was demonstrated by researchers at the University of Copenhagen that can fuse together both semiconductor and metallic materials with atomic precision at their interface. This way, nanowires and their electrical contacts have been fused in one hybrid material which might lay the foundation for the next generation of semiconductor electronics. A perfect fit In the

Nanotechnology, News, Technology

‘Pop-up’ method makes 3-D complex nano structures from 2-D, similar to a children’s book

Various examples of flower-like structures formed from a two-dimensional structure transferred onto a stretched elastic material. Credit: University of Illinois

Researchers at Northwestern University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign recently demonstrated a new technique for building complex and very fine 3D micro and nano structures out of 2-D shapes. The whole process is very similar to how a children’s pop-up book works, starting as a flat 2D surface only to expand into a 3D shape when prompted. The authors note that the pop-up method has various advantages over 3D printing, including use of multiple materials during the fabrication process and integration with electronics.

Nanotechnology, Videos

The World’s Smallest Snowman

snowman

At just 10 µm across, this little guy is only 1/5th the width of a human hair. The snowman was made from two tin beads used to calibrate electron microscope astigmatism. The eyes and smile were milled using a focused ion beam, and the nose, which is under 1 µm wide (or 0.001 mm), is ion beam deposited platinum. Image and

Nanotechnology, News, Technology

Prism-like bar code pattern might help make computers that use light instead of wires

This tiny slice of silicon etched with a bar-code pattern might one day lead to computers that use light instead of wires. Image: Vuckovic Lab

A breakthrough in optical communications has been reported by Stanford engineers who used a complex algorithm to design a prism-like device that splits light into different colours (frequencies) and at right angles. This is the absolute first step towards building a circuit, and ultimately a computer, that uses light instead of wires to relay signals. This way, much more compact and