SETI project uses AI to track down mysterious light source

Scientists are still in the dark but the new insights place them a step closer to the source of fast radio bursts.

The Search for Alien Life: We Have Been Looking in the Wrong Places

If there are any, aliens should be less conspicuous and charismatic-looking than most people think.

SETI observes a “strong signal,” but don’t get your hopes up just yet

A star system 94 light-years away stepped in as a potential candidate for intelligent life.

Observing Alien Armageddon could be our first sign of advanced civilizations in space.

It may be possible to observe the presence of an advanced alien civilization by the effects produced if that civilization were to self-destruct through nuclear war, biological warfare, nanotechnological annihilation, or stellar pollution. Each case would generate unique detectable signs that could be identified by earth-based telescopes.

Alien megastructure turns out to be passing comets — SETI confirms

If you’re an alien buff or just really, really bored with knowing just one species that can hold a decent conversation, this might come as a bummer. SETI has confirmed that KIC 8462852, the 1,500 light-years away star that’s been all over the news as potentially having signs of an advanced alien megastructure built around it is just a regular, run of the mill, alien-free ball of atomic fire.

Astrobiologists testify before Congress that alien life will be encountered by 2034

This past week, a few scientists took the bench and gave the U.S. Congress a relative date by which they expect we’ll have discovered signs of intelligent life elsewhere in the universe. According to their estimates, by 2034 we should make first contact or 30 years ahead of Star Trek’s first contact. Whether this was just a stunt, a ploy

SETI to check recently discovered Kepler science

There’s been a lot of buzz around the planets discovered by the Kepler telescope, particularly about Kepler-22b – the planet which, outside Earth, has the biggest chances to host life (that we know of). Now, SETI will tune in and start listening to see if there are any aliens with something to say on those planets. SETI struggles Sadly, SETI

Shorties: SETI is just $6.000 from achieving the necessary funds

A while ago, we were telling you how SETI (site here) is closing down due to lack of funding. We also published an infographic showing the relative cost of the program – which is about as much as a Tomahawk missile. Thankfully, they have been receiving a whole lot donation, and now they’re really close to the amount they need

Infographic: the cost of SETI

As previously reported, SETI, the international organization which handles the search for electromagnetic transmissions from civilizations on distant planets, will shut down soon due to lack of funding. What’s really bothersome is that, although we all know we live in trouble economic times, the cost of keeping SETI going is simply peanuts for the US government or the huge corporations.

SETI shuts down due to lack of funding

Carl Sagan must be twisting and twitching in his grave. SETI, the project which became synonymus with searching for extraterrestrial intelligent life, was unable to gether the $5 million it needed – which is just 0.0074% (!) of the United States military budget; talk about priorities… Anyway, SETI has shut down its telescope array, which consists of 42 20-foot-wide telescopes

Terrestrial Planets might form around stars similar to the Sun

What seemed to be a very natural and obvious conclusion needed a whole lot of studies and research to be proven; terrestrial planets might form around many, if not most, of the nearby stars which are similar to the sun, or at least resemble it greatly. These studies suggest that life may be actually quite common in our galaxy. Michael