What Greenland’s landscape looks like without any ice

Let’s hope this landscape is never in the open.

Unless coal is phased out by 2050, Antarctica’s melting ice sheet could drive a massive surge in sea level rise

Some countries are already planning to phase out coal by 2030 but it’s not enough.

Global sea levels rose 50% faster than two decades ago because of Greenland’s melting ice sheet

The cost of non-action could be dramatic by the end of the century.

West Antarctic ice sheet is melting from the inside, signaling an accelerated collapse

The ice shelf is far more fragile than we hoped.

New subglacial lakes discovered in Greenland accelerating melting

Using satellite imagery, scientists have discovered two new subglacial lakes under Greenland’s ice sheet bringing the total number to four. The discovery is not well met, however. These lakes are already drained, signaling that climate change is making its way beneath the Greenland ice sheet. The discovery suggests subglacial lakes could increase the sensitivity of ice to climatic change, further accelerating ice melt which can lead to catastrophic floods.

Global warming will open shipping routes directly through the North Pole by 2050

A group of researchers assessed seven individual climate models and found that in each case common open water vessels will be able to navigate through portions of the Arctic, currently possible only with icebreaker ships, by the mid-century. Moreover, the thinning ice will allow ice-strengthened vessels to sail directly over the pole, something currently unimaginable, dramatically shortening travel distance, time and cost.

Antarctic rift the size of the Grand Canyon speeds ice sheet melting

Scientists from Britain have found a remote ice rift valley, up to one mile deep, under the ice in Antarctica. The rift is similar in size and depth to the Grand Canyon and because it is direct contact with the warming ocean, it’s been found that it has a significant contribution to the unusual ice sheet melting of West Antarctica. The rift

Iceberg twice the size of Manhattan breaks off Greenland glacier

Researchers at the University of Delaware and the Canadian Ice Service recently reported that an ice island, whose surface is twice that of Manhattan, broke off from Greenland’s Petermann Glacier, one of the two largest glaciers left in Greenland connecting the great Greenland ice sheet with the ocean via a floating ice shelf. The 46-square-mile giant iceberg broke off from the glacier on

Ice sheets in Antarctica formed by massive fall in CO2

Antarctica is the most the arid place on Earth. Its climate is so rough, so hazardous that no permanent human populace can live there, however just a few million years ago the harsh plains of the south and north poles had a subtropical climate – a paradise for life. During a transition period of just 100,000 years, a blink of an eye

Antarctica’s amazing striped icebergs

When you think of Antarctica, pristine white icebergs usually come to mind; probably the last thing you’d expect are humbug-like striped icebergs, with blue, green, yellow and even brown. The different colours appear due to various reasons, but generally speaking they appear because some layers of ice form in special conditions. Blue stripes are the most common, and they appear

Warm summers cause extreme ice melting in Greenland

Recently a study was conducted by a team led by Dr Edward Hanna at the University of Sheffield which demonstrated that recent warm summers have caused the most extreme Greenland ice melting in 50 years. This is yet another proof of the damage caused by global warming and it also helps scientists place recent satellite observations of Greenland´s shrinking ice