The Pacific Garbage patch is 16 times bigger than we thought

Yikes.

Aerial survey shows the ‘Great Pacific Garbage Patch’ is much larger than we thought

In case you didn’t know, there’s a huge garbage patch floating around in the Pacific.

Containing Asia’s coasts is out best bet for plastic-free ocean

Plastic bags, bottle caps and plastic fibres are among the myriad of micro plastic debris that wash out into the Pacific Ocean. These get ingested by the marine life like fish, mammals and birds which are dying from choking, intestinal blockage and starvation. Moreover, some are toxic pollutants that are absorbed, transported, and consumed in the food chain eventually reaching humans. The most effective way to contain microplastics is to raise floating nets around Asia’s coats, not around the Great Pacific Garbage patch, researchers reckon.

US puts twice as much trash in landfills than previously thought

Americans are sending much more trash to landfills than federal agencies estimated – twice as much, according to a new study.

NASA research put together into a video showing how the ocean’s garbage patches formed over the last 35 years

Aaah, the ocean. The true final frontier. Full of wonderful and exciting things, such as strange fish, stranger crustaceans, beautiful hydrothermal vents, and lovely, ever-growing garbage patches.

Aesthetic arrangements from garbage? Alejandro Duran’s site-specific dirty decorations

They say that one man’s trash is another man’s gold, but artist Alejandro Duran gave a whole new meaning to that saying. Walking along the coastline in Sian Ka’an, Mexico’s largest federally-protected reserve, he collects many bits of trash that wash up on the coast from all over the world and uses them for site site-specific installations for an ongoing project titled Washed Up. The

Man cleans up entire river on his way to work

We all see garbage in our daily routine, be it on the way to work, school, or just on the streets. But most people just choose to ignore it; after all, what difference could one man possibly do? Well, Tommy Kleyn didn’t think like that when he was walking pass a polluted river to work. He took a bag of garbage

City ants are garbage eating, rat-fighting machines

Ants often get a lot of bad rep for being “pests” in the city, but a new study has shown that ant populations are actually very helpful in urban environments. Scientists researching the behavior of ants have found that they dispose of garbage with remarkable efficiency, keeping rats and other garbage-dependent pests at bay. “Urban green spaces provide ecosystem services to

Great garbage patches in the Great Lakes resemble those in the Pacific

In the 1980s a report described how a ginormous patch of plastic trash was guided by currents and concentrated right in the middle of the Pacific Ocean in an area that some estimated as being roughly two times the size of Texas. Naturally, people all over the world were outraged, but I guess it didn’t last too long, nor did it matter