We owe the shape of our jaws, at least in part, to our ancestors’ love of cheese

Cheese — it literally made your bones what they are.

Modern humans might’ve killed off the Neanderthals by eating all the mammoth

Dibs on the last slice.

Vegetarian diet found to be twice as effective at reducing weight

You might not like it, but that’s just the way things are.

Americans aren’t only wasting the most food — they’re also throwing out the best bits

The worst of both worlds.

Where you shop influences how healthily you eat — but only about half as much as who you are

All food is good. But only some of it is good for you.

What is gluten and why some people have gluten intolerance

Gluten Morgen!

Eating fruit may have given primates their big brains, paving the way for social structures

Chow down.

The Hunger Games: Extreme calorie reduction may increase lifespan

Five days of hunger a month could significantly reduce aging and age-related medical conditions.

Low calorie diet ensures longer and healthier lifespan for monkeys

Researchers just added more weight to the idea that a low-calorie diet extends lifespan.

Cockroach milk: superfood of the future?

What better way to top off your meal?

How the American diet leaves people both overfed and undernourished at the same time

More than half of American’s calories come from ultra-processed foods, a new study finds. The data also indicates close to 90% of total added sugar intake can be traced back to these foodstuffs.

Why most diets don’t work

Universal diets don’t work because “healthy food” varies from person to person, a new study¬†has found. Sadly, only a fraction of all people truly eat healthily these days – we all have our own struggles with food, either because we eat too much, or we eat things that are bad for us, or we don’t have enough money to buy

Low fat diets have a very low impact, decade-long study finds

A meta-analysis of 53 weight-loss studies spanning over several decades and focusing on 68,000 people found that weight loss have a very low impact – if any.

New dietary guidelines will bring fats back

“Fat is bad” seems to be a general rule when concocting dietary guidelines, but fatty foods may be making a comeback for all the right reasons. The latest version of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which is due out later this year will eliminate the upper limit for total dietary fat intake.

Tricking your body to think it’s fasting might help you live longer and healthier

Fasting has been practiced since ancient times as a cleansing process, often accompanied by prayer and periods of seclusion. Famous enlightened historical figures like Jesus or Buddha are prime examples of such ascetic practice. The latter raised fasting to an artform. But fasting needs not be merely associated with spiritualism or religion – it could very well be a great tool to improve your health. Several studies have documented the benefits of fasting, but on the other hand how many of us could go through such excruciating torments, living on water alone for days at a time (some Buddhist monks do it for weeks). After all, low calorie diets are hard enough, let alone not eating altogether. A new study, however, suggests that there might be a way to trick your body it’s in fasting mode, and thus reap the benefits, without actually going overboard.

Obese teens are much more susceptible to junk food commercials, brain scans reveal

It’s no secret that TV food commercials stimulate pleasure and reward centers in the brain, after all advertisers wouldn’t pay big money for them to air if they didn’t entice people to order more. In fact, food advertising has increased dramatically over the past 30 years. Teenagers are exposed on average to 13 food commercials on any given day. At the same time, childhood and adolescent obesity in the US has been on the rise fast and worrisome, so we can’t help but notice the connection. Now, researchers at Dartmouth found overweight teens are disproportionately affected by TV food commercials, as key brain regions that control pleasure, taste and – most surprisingly – the mouth are all much more stimulated than those teens with less body fat. The findings are important since they suggest overweight teens exposed to this kind of environment will experience further difficulties when they try to lose weight. A further insight is that dietary plans should also target subsequent thinking concerning eating food, not just the temptation.

Panda poo shows they shouldn’t munch on bamboo so much

Giant pandas love to feast on bamboo – it’s their favorite food, and they easily make quick work of it, using their powerful jaws to peel the plant’s tough bark and get to its tender core. But even though the pandas love it, their stomachs don’t – a new study has revealed that the panda’s stomach is not adapted to a completely herbivorous diet, and still craves for an omnivorous meal, like other bears.

High-fat diet might put your mental health at risk

Mice that had gut bacteria transferred from other mice fed with a high fat diet changed their behavior in a negative way, exhibiting anxiety or impaired memory. The findings suggest that apart from heart disease and stroke, obesity might put people’s mental health at risk as well.

84% of American Vegetarians Relapse after one Year

A study conducted on 11,000 Americans found that the vast majority of vegetarians relapse totally or partially after only one year. A third of them relapse after only three months. Vegetarianism is the practice of intentional abstaining from the consumption of meat (red meat, poultry, seafood and the flesh of any other animal), as well as any other byproducts obtained through

Gut bacteria may control your mind by influencing your dietary choices

Our gut hosts an enormous population of bacteria, each species with its own niche (they feed on certain foods), which outnumbers our own cells 100-fold. Most of these bacteria are good bacteria, though. In fact, you couldn’t survive without most of them! They’re among the best decomposers, breaking down dead and organic matter otherwise impossible by the gut alone. But