Nobody is going to make coal great again, says Bloomberg New Energy Finance founder

Sorry, bro.

Solid energy — how batteries power the world

Power in the palm of your hand.

Atomic-sandwich material could make computers 100 times more energy efficient

Don’t need a calculator to know that’s a lot.

Cooking nuclear waste into glass and ceramic materials could provide safe, efficient containment

Vitrification is the way to go.

The combined capacity of the renewable energy sector overtakes that of coal

No more black lung.

Iceland drilling project close to plugging into the Mid-Atlantic ridge

In a few months, Iceland will be drawing power directly from molten rock.

The U.S. plans to build the most advanced fusion reactor ever

Endless clean energy is just too good to pass up.

Why the first, tiny offshore wind farm in the U.S. is a huge step forward

These five turbines signal a change through out the country.

Chernobyl is to become the world’s largest solar power plant

This huge area will finally produce energy — 30 years after the meltdown.

First solar-powered boat to cross the Atlantic embarks on historical journey

A little ship braving the ocean on its own.

The price of solar keeps falling, Dubai received the lowest ever asking bid for energy

A few days ago, India’s Energy Minister Piyush Goyal announced that solar energy became cheaper to produce than coal-powered, costing roughly 6 US cents/kWh. Now, it’s become even cheaper: the Dubai Electricity and Water Authority (DEWA) received the lowest ever asking price for solar energy, at US 2.99 cents/kWh.

This is how one French power plant produces electricity using cheese

The town of Albertville in southeastern France has begun using cheese to generate electricity. Their power plant, build in the Savoie region, uses the byproduct of the local Beaufort cheeses as the base for its biogas power generation system.

UK set to unveil the world’s largest floating solar array

The largest floating solar array in the world is to be unveiled later this month, on the Queen Elizabeth II reservoir, at Walton-on-Thames. The array is estimated to generate almost 6 million kWh in its maiden year of operations. The energy will be used to power London’s water treatment plants.

MIT develops new solar cells, 400 times more efficient and light enough to drape a soap bubble

An MIT research team has developed a new technology that will allow for the creation of lighter and thinner solar cells than ever before. While the team says there is still work to be done before making them commercially available, the panels already proved their efficacy in laboratory settings. They hope that their work will power the next generation of portable

Less burns for more sunshine: renewable and fossil fuel technology integration sounds like a beach-goer’s dream

Solar-aided power plants could mean less CO2 for a fraction of the costs of solar-only, paving the way for a full-renewable power supply.

A Position of Power alters the Voice in a Way that transmits Who’s in Charge to Others

Inspired by Margaret Thatcher’s formidable political skills, researchers in the US sought to understand how a position of power changes a person’s voice, and how this in turn affects their relation with other people. Indeed, being in power alters the acoustic properties of the voice and those tuning in can pick up cues that tell them who’s really in charge.

Future cars could be partially powered by their bodywork

Parts of the car’s bodywork could double up as it’s batter in a not so far away future; at least that’s what the people involved in the 3.4 million project believe. They are working on a prototype that can store and discharge electrical energy; the material is also light and very hard. Ultimately, this will not only double the battery,

Significant breakthrough in biofuels

I was writing a while ago that major biofuel production is not really that far away and the good news is things seem to be moving in that direction. The importance of biofuels has been underlined as a possible solution to fight the crisis, but the big problem was that creating such alternative fuels required too big amounts of power,