A year in space — it really changes your genes

There’s no need to panic, but these aren’t exactly happy news.

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly returned to the U.S. 2 inches taller

Astronaut Scott Kelly returned to planet Earth on Thursday, after a landing in which everything went smoothly, as expected.

Astronaut Scott Kelly returns home after a year in space

Today is homecoming day for a record-setting crew. Three Expedition 46 crew members from the International Space Station are finishing packing the Soyuz TMA-18M spacecraft for the ride home today, ending their record-setting mission. In November 2012, NASA, the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), and their international partners selected two veteran spacefarers for a one-year mission aboard the International Space Station

Astronaut Scott Kelly Breaks Record for Days in Space, and It’s Important

United States Astronaut Scott Kelly has just beaten the record for the most cumulative days in space, and this is significant for several reasons.

Mother Earth: photo-documented from space by astronaut Scott Kelly

Veteran astronaut Scott Kelly launched in March, 2015 aboard a Soyuz rocket for a record breaking one-year stay at the ISS. Instead of three to six months, Kelly along with his Russian colleague, Mikhail Korniyenko, will spend 12 months so scientists can assess how his body responds to the stress. For instance, we know that living in microgravity atrophies muscles and deteriorates vision. Kelly isn’t too worried, though. When not busy operating the International Space Station, Kelly is engaged in one of the most pleasing hobbies (for those of us living back on Earth, that is): space photography. Here are just a couple of his most amazing shots shared by Kelly on his facebook or twitter account. He updates these very frequently, even a couple of times a day, so be sure to tune in for some more gems.

NASA to conduct unprecedented twin experiment: one twin will spend a year circling the Earth, while the other stays grounded

It’s something that puzzled me for years now: consider a pair of identical twins; say, one¬†gets a job as an astronaut and rockets into space. The other is also an astronaut, but he decides to skip this one and stay home. After a while, they reunite, but are they still identical? That’s exactly what NASA wants to find out! In