The Earth had continental crust much earlier than thought — potentially life, too

The Earth’s ‘young’ phase might have been much shorter than we assume.

What is the Wilson Cycle, builder and slayer of supercontinents?

There’re two ways you can find out how supercontinents form.
This is the one where you don’t have to wait millions of years.

Silica rains helped form Earth’s crust four and a half billion years ago

Talk about hailstone, right?

Scientists discover another layer in the Earth’s mantle

Most people tend to think of the Earth in terms of crust, mantle and core, and while those are indeed the largest “layers” (you can’t properly call the mantle a layer though), each one of them is made from other, thinner layers. Now, researchers from the University of Utah have identified another one of these thinner layers, 930 miles beneath our feet.

Scientists find direct evidence that CO2 heats the Earth’s crust

When we’re talking about CO2 emissions and global warming, we generally mean atmospheric CO2 – where the gas is spewed and generates the greenhouse effect, warming our atmosphere and subsequently, our planet. But a new study conducted by US researchers found that CO2 actually warms the Earth’s crust directly; the more CO2 we emit, the hotter our planet will get.

The thickest layer of the Earth

The Earth can be divided into four main layers: the solid crust on the outside, the mantle, the outer core and the inner core. Out of them, the mantle is the thickest layer, while the crust is the thinnest layer.

Deep lying bacteria found, reproduce only once in 10.000 years

A surprisingly diverse range of life forms exists deep in the oceanic crust, but they live at an extremely slow pace. Long lived bacteria, which reproduce only once in 10.000 years, have been found in rocks 2.5km below the ocean floor, rocks which are 100 million years old. Viruses and fungi have also been found in the same conditions. Aside

Understanding magma in the mantle: rocks melt at greater depth than previously thought

Magma forms much deeper than geologists previously believed, according to a new study conducted by Rice University. Magma and Crust   The group led by geologist Rajdeep Dasgupta put very small samples of peridotite under very large pressures, to find out if the rock can liquify, at least in small amounts, as deep as 250 km beneath the ocean floor.