When he was 12, Martin Pistorius came home with a sore throat. His condition quickly deteriorated and he was soon unable to move or even talk, and eventually crashed into a coma which would go on to last 12 years. It’s not clear what his disease was, and doctors don’t really know what happened to him, though the likely suspect is cryptococcal meningitis. Everybody thought he was a “vegetable”, but after 12 years in a coma, not only did he wake up – but he says he remembers everything and was perfectly conscious for most of the time. His body became his prison, but he was ultimately able to escape after spending years trying to communicate with the outside world.

Painfully aware … Martin Pistorius could hear and see everything around him but couldn’t communicate. Picture: YouTube/Thomas Nelson Source: Supplied.

According to Martin, about two years in his condition, he regained consciousness.

[Read Martin Pistorius’ book – Ghost Boy The Miraculous Escape of a Misdiagnosed Boy Trapped Inside His Own Body]

“I was aware of everything,” he said, “just like any normal person. Everyone was so used to me not being there that they didn’t notice when I began to be present again. The stark reality hit me that I was going to spend the rest of my life like that – totally alone.”

Unfortunately, there were no tests conducted on him at the time, which would have likely figured out that his brain is very much active. Martin is subject of the first episode of NPR’s new series Invisibilia.

He says that among the worst memories is the cartoon character Barney, which he was forced to watch for hours and hours straight.

‘I cannot even express to you how much I hated Barney,’ Martin recalled on the first episode of NPR’s new radio show about human behavior, Invisibilia.

Pistorius could see and even hear what was around him, but he couldn’t move. He felt as if his body was encased, and even when he started to make small movements, nobody noticed. That’s when the sadness really kicked in… and Barney was the last straw.

“You don’t really think about anything. You simply exist. It’s a very dark place to find yourself because, in a sense, you are allowing yourself to vanish.”

He was aware of important events happening in the world by hearing around him, and he was also aware that his family had continued their lives without him.

“I have a younger brother and a sister, and they and my parents would go on holidays without me, which was extremely difficult. The worst part was that I had a perpetual fear they’d have a car accident and die, and would never come to fetch me,” Pistorius told MailOnline. “I never felt angry with my parents as I knew they loved me and they did the best they could. But I felt furious about the situation. There were many times when I cried inside. I reached a point where I essentially gave up.”

Interestingly enough, it was his aromatherapist, Virna van der Walt, that picked up on his subtle “language” — virtually imperceptible smiles, gazes and nods he used to indicate he was paying attention. He was about 25.

“Happiness surged through me. I was Muhammad Ali, John McEnroe, Fred Trueman. Crowds roared their approval as I took a lap of honour,” Pistorius said of the moment his therapist acknowledged his consciousness.

She insisted that Martin should be tested, and the parents allowed this. The tests confirmed that he was awake and responsive. His parents bought him a computer with communication software, and after years and years of practice, he was able to communicate using synthetic speech. In 2003, Pistorius got a paid job at the health centre, working one day a week.

Incredible story … Martin Pistorius, 39, has regained control of his body. Picture: Facebook/Martin Pistorius Source: Supplied

“At every turn my eyes opened in wonder as I crashed into new experience: seeing a man with brightly coloured hair like parrot feathers running down the centre of his head; tasting a cloud of melting sugar called candy floss; feeling the warm pleasure that comes with going shopping for the first time to buy Christmas presents for my family; or the sharp surprise of seeing women in short skirts,” he said.

His condition started to improve, and he eventually learned how to make websites and graduated from University. He now has his own business as a web designer and is married. This truly is a stunning story, one that shows how much we still don’t understand about the comatose state, and about the human body in general.

Enjoyed this article? Join 40,000+ subscribers to the ZME Science newsletter. Subscribe now!

Like us on Facebook