This camera can see around corners in real time

The future is now – researchers at the Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland have developed a camera that can see around corners and track movements in real time.

Here’s how dolphins “see” humans through echolocation

An unprecedented image created by UK and US researchers shows how a submerged human is “seen” by dolphins through echolocation. Echolocation, also called bio sonar, is the biological sonar used by several kinds of animals, including dolphins. Basically, they emit sounds around them and then listen to the returning echo to locate and identify different objects or creatures around them.

Convergent evolution in bats and dolphins driven by same genes

It’s amazing how two different animals from two completely different environments evolve some identical physical features. Take bats and dolphins for instance. Both of them use a complex system that produces, receives and process ultrasonic sound waves in order to identify visually hidden objects, track down prey or navigate through obstacles better – typically this is referred to as echolocation,

Hawk moths jam the bat sonar signals by rubbing their genitals

It’s a dog eat dog out there, and any advantage you can get is more than welcome – as strange as it may be. According to a research published in Biology Letters on 3 July, Hawk moths create an ultrasonic noise that could be used to scare off an attacking bat and to jam the bat’s sonar. Radar jamming is

Rainforest plant evolved beacon for pollinating bats

A lot of attenton has been given to plants that visually attract pollinating bees, through bright colours and spectacular designs, but bats play a very important role for pollinating as well, and there is much we have yet to understand about how they can be attracted by plants. Researchers have now discovered that a species of rainforest vine, pollinated by

Echolocation: a new chance for the blind?

As much as technology has improved, the blind still struggle with many of the problems they faced say, 1000 years ago. However, as researchers from the the University of Alcalá de Henares (UAH) have discovered, the solution may be provided by nature, or more exactly by  other inhabitants of our planet: dolphins and bats. It seems that humans can be