mountains slackline festival

Image credits: Giordano Garosio

There’s nothing quite like lounging in a hammock, relaxing in the outdoors and feeling the breeze while hanging hundreds of meters from the ground. Wait, what?! You read that right – at this festival, balance is key – not just because it’s a slackline festival, but also because you get to relax and rest in hammocks hanged way above the ground.

mountain slackline festival

Image credits: Balaz Mohai

Participants call themselves “slackers” – because of the slacklines they balance themselves on. This extreme sport is somewhat similar to rope walking, but the slackline is different from a traditional rope – it has a slightly flattened shaped and has slack, meaning that it can move side-to-side or bounce.

mountain slackline festival

Image credits: Sebastian Wahlhuetter

The festival takes place every year in one of Italy’s most beautiful places – the Dolomites. This place also has a historical significance, being one of the most bloody battle fields in WWI. 15.000 soldiers were killed there, most of whom were young.

mountain slack line festival

Image credits: Sebastian Wahlhuetter

“We discovered this mountain as a perfect place for highlining and wanted to stimulate this historic place in a different and new way. During the war soldiers of our age killed each other and sorrow, hate and fear dictated their daily life… The sound of granates and guns introduced the winter, but we introduce the winter with happiness, teamwork and a big passion for the mountains. This meeting brings highliners and mountain passionate people from all over the world together”, organizers write on the festival’s website.

Image credits: Sebastian Wahlhuetter

Aside for practicing and competing in the extreme sport, participants can also watch movie and presentations, meet up with special guests and participate in yoga workshops. I’m not sure if I want to sign up, or run as far away as I possibly can.

Image credits: Sebastian Wahlhuetter

Image credits: Sebastian Wahlhuetter

Image credits: Sebastian Wahlhuetter

Image credits: unknown (via Bored Panda).

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