Scientists react to correlation between height and cancer incidence

A few days ago, we were telling you about a potentially groundbreaking study which found a rather surprising correlation between height and cancer incidence. The study made quite a wave within the scientific community and was met with quite mixed opinions. Here are some of those impressions, from leading experts in the field. Prof Mel Greaves, Director of the Centre

Lab-Grown Kidneys Transplanted to Animals

For the first time, Japanese researchers have successfully grown a pair of kidneys in a lab and then transplanted them into animals. The organs functioned just fine, and this gives big hopes for the transplants ultimately moving to humans.

These images show how different and unique tears really are

In our day to day lives, we don’t give much thought to tears – we usually focus more on the emotions that cause them than the salty droplets themselves. Well, tears are much more complex than we give them credit for, as Dutch artist Maurice Mikkers showed. Tears Caused By Emotional Response: There are actually three main type of tears: basal

Sitting down for too long is really bad for you – see why [VIDEO]

Though it enjoys to sit or lie down from time to time, the human body is made for moving not sitting. It’s all hardwired in our biology. Inside, there are about 360 joints and about 700 skeletal muscles that enable easy, fluid motion. Our skin is stretchy. The blood circulates best when the body is upright. Basically, every cell in our body itches for a walk. But when you sit down for too long, all sorts of health problems can arise from back and muscle pain, to more threatening long-term problems like hearth disease or cancer. I’ll leave you to Murat Dalkilinç in this extremely enlightening, but also practical TED animated video.

Bonobo anatomy offers clues on how our body evolved

A pair of anthropologists compared the anatomical features o bonobos to those of homo sapiens and other apes to infer any clues that might help us understand how we evolved to look the way we do.

Risky brain, safe brain: MIT charts neural pathways involved in decision-making

Researchers at MIT have now identified a neural circuit that they believe underpins decision-making in situations such as this, and have started looking into mice’s brains to better understand the biological processes that make us tick and help us pick.

Why in the world do we have chins? Maybe, because we evolved from being just brutes

Ever wondered what chins are good for? Upon a quick reflection, you might think it actually has some practical value, supporting your jaw against the massive chewing forces. But that’s nonsense. It doesn’t do any of that, as a recent research concludes. In fact, the chin – the last facial feature to stop growing – actually makes the jaw less resistant to the bending stress of chewing as we age. Though still a mystery, scientists believe the chin is actually a side effect of the rest of the face having become smaller. Much smaller than that of early ancestors or cousin Neanderthals, at least.

Good News: Biggest Study Yet of Penis Size Confirms Average Size

Guys, I’ve got some good news about your penis size.

54% of men and 31% of women over age 70 are sexually active

We tend to think that sexual activity slows down and ultimately stops as we end, but a new study has shown that it’s not as bad as we think. Over half of all men and almost a third of all women over 70 are still sexually active – with over a third of all people having sex at least twice a month.

The development of babies’ brains relies directly on fat from the mother’s bottom and thighs

We like big butts and I know why: because it helps babies develop their brains properly. Researchers have found that especially during breastfeeding, the development of babies’ brains relies on fat supplies stripped directly from the mother’s thighs and bottom.

Imaging Cancer with Sound and Light

In 2003, Dr. Lihong V. Wang at Washington University introduced one of the most exciting technologies we’ve had the chance to see in a long while. By combining ultrasound and light absorption, Wang and colleagues developed a new method that makes multicontrast images of biological tissues several inches below the skin. Among others, this allows specialists to see cancer in action with unprecedented

Scratching makes Itching Worse: the Molecular Mechanism behind the Itch

Seems like your mom was right all along: scratching does, in fact, makes the itching worse. This was the conclusion reached by a group of researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis after the scientists studied the molecular and neural pathways that cause and relieve itching. The findings suggest that scratching releases serotonin – a key neurotransmitter involved in

New Paint-on, See-through bandage Emits Phosphorescent Glow for Healing Below

An interdisciplinary  team of researchers has created a paint-on, see-through, “smart” bandage that glows to indicate a wound’s tissue oxygenation concentration. Oxygenation plays a crucial role in healing, so mapping it in severe wounds and burns can help to significantly improve the success of surgeries to restore limbs and physical functions. “Information about tissue oxygenation is clinically relevant but is often

Scientist gives himself Fecal Transplant from Hunter-Gatherer from Tanzania… to See how it Goes

A field researcher from America has transplanted fecal microbiome from a Tanzanian tribesman to his own gut. Why? Well… to see what happens, basically. “AS THE SUN set over Lake Eyasi in Tanzania, nearly thirty minutes had passed since I had inserted a turkey baster into my bum and injected the feces of a Hadza man – a member of one of

Heart rate variability keeps the body in optimal shape

The heart regularly speeds up or down its beating frequency to adjust to the body’s needs. Even in stable conditions (when you’re not particularly active or your active for a constant time), the amount of time between heart beats is variable. A team of doctors and engineers at Caltech’s Division of Engineering and Applied Science have now found a better way to assess

Gut bacteria may control your mind by influencing your dietary choices

Our gut hosts an enormous population of bacteria, each species with its own niche (they feed on certain foods), which outnumbers our own cells 100-fold. Most of these bacteria are good bacteria, though. In fact, you couldn’t survive without most of them! They’re among the best decomposers, breaking down dead and organic matter otherwise impossible by the gut alone. But

Japanese woman is first recipient of next-generation stem cells

A Japanese woman in her 70s is the world’s first recipient of cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells, a technology that promises to work wonders and has the scientific community excited about the perspectives. Surgeons working on the case created the retinal tissue after reverting the patient’s own cells to ‘pluripotent’ state. If you’d like to benefit from stem cells, but

Heartbeat electricity generator powers pacemaker

Swiss scientists from the University of Bern demonstrated a new device that essentially generates electrical power from the mechanical energy of heartbeats.

These rocks in your head keep you balanced

The beautiful colored image above might look like beach pebbles, yet in reality it shows a glimpse from an even tinnier world – it’s a colored scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of calcium carbonate deposited on the surface of an otolith, found in the Acoustic Macula. These tiny debris also fit a purpose, helping the body stay in equilibrium, whether in static (position of the head) or dynamic equilibrium (relative position function of linear acceleration)

Boy born without ears has a pair made from his ribs

Nine-year-old Kieran Sorkin was born without ears, but now, doctors made him a pair of ears from his own ribs. Kieran suffered from a rare condition in which his ears didn’t fully form – he had just small lobes where his ears should have been. He was almost deaf, but thanks to several previous procedures, his hearing slowly started to