Suidobashi Heavy Industries accepts US’s Megabot Inc challenge for a giant robot duel

Earlier this month, Megabots Inc issued a video challenge on Youtube to Suidobashi Heavy Industries, to pit the company’s’ biggest, baddest robots against each other in a duel of giant robots. And grab the popcorn, put the beer on ice and get your geek on, because Japanese robot manufacturer has accepted the challenge from its US competitor, Efe news agency reported.

The great Pan-Pacific Robot Duel

USA’s MegaBots Inc issued a challenge to Suidobashi Heavy Industry, Japanese robotics manufacturer, to a giant, epic, ROBOT DUEL (hype intensifies).

So you’ve come face to face with a bear; what should you do to bear through this?

A Montana family came perilously close to a grizzly bear near Yellowstone Park in the US when it jumped on the hood of their car. The family stayed in their car, kept the windows closed, and eventually the bear got bored and wandered off. But what happens if you don’t have the safety of a vehicle?

Rosetta spacecraft finds huge sinkholes on comet’s surface

Rosetta is a robotic space probe built and launched by the European Space Agency. Along with Philae, its lander module, the craft is performing a detailed study of comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. The probe usually orbits 67P at a distance of a few hundred kilometers. Footage received from Rosetta over the last year showed a number of dust jets coming from the comet,

The Great Barrier Reef left out of UNESCO “in danger” list, environmental group films turtle-back video to raise awareness of the area’s fragility

The Great Barrier Reef, which stretches 2,000km (1,200 miles) along the coast, is the world’s largest living ecosystem. Environmental groups are pushing to get the reef listed as “in danger” by the UNESCO, so that the Australian government would have to work harder to protect it from various dangers such as pollution, dredging, fishing and so on. The UN says this

Check yourself (grammar wise) before you wreck yourself!

The Grammar Police can breathe a sigh of relief as the guys over at Pop Chart Lab have put together a poster to help them fight un-grammarness everywhere.

This is how the Moon looks under the microscope!

The Apollo program returned 380.05 kg of lunar rocks and soil, and most of the samples are stored at the Lunar Sample Laboratory Facility. The samples of rocks, breccias, and regolith were polished into thin sections, allowing for optical geologic studies to be performed on them.

Pause the cat video and read this article: or keep watching cat videos, science says it’s awesome

A study conducted by assistant professor Jessica Gall Myrick, surveyed almost 7,000 people about their viewing of cat videos and how it affects their moods, to try and find out why so many of us enjoy seeing the furry little pets on video.

California’s grasslands suffer from drought, reducing wildflower diversity

The team looked at 15-years worth of data on California’s grasslands, and documented declining plant diversity from 2000 to 2014 at both the local community (5 m2) and landscape (27 km2) scales, across multiple functional groups and soil environments. They found a link between wildflower diversity decline to significant decreases in midwinter precipitation.

Some models no longer available: Earth enters its 6th mass extinction phase, humans accelerate the losses

Geological evidence indicate that our planet has seen five mass extinction cycles since life first appeared on the planet. While they sound like the kind of cataclysmic events that only beardy men with huge boats survive through (read that in a book once, so it must be true), they are actually an integral part of life. The cycles free up

Rising oceans and sinking bread: how climate change might ruin loaves

A research group working at the Australian Grains Free Air CO₂ Enrichment facility (AgFace) in Victoria is studying the effect elevated carbon dioxide will have on crops such as wheat, lentils, canola and field pea. They grow experimental crops in the open, surrounded by thin tubes that eject carbon dioxide into the air around the plants. Findings show that crops have higher yield (up to 25% more), but less proteins. Elevated CO2 also seems to ruin bread made from the grown wheat.

Gold doesn’t fall out of the sky – but it’s created in the heavens

Research based on recent observations of a nearby gamma-ray burst, GRB 130603B, help explain how gold, silver and other heavy metal atoms are created.

NASA releases 4K timelapse of photos taken from the ISS – artists create epic videos

As the ISS hurtles in orbit around the Earth, an eternal freefall at 17,100 mph, its cameras, and the astronauts on board, are capturing images and footage of our planet below — much of which is from NASA, and therefore public domain.

Maasai women bring (solar powered) light to fend off predators lurking in the night

A new project started by Green Energy Africa in September 2014 has brought solar energy to 2,000 homes in Naiputa county alone, and put new power into the hands of women who sell affordable solar installations.

Smithsonian slow motion video shows plant’s explosive birth

The guys over at the Smithsonian Channel run a great show about plants. One of the recent short videos they posted online show how violets, touch me nots, and squirting cucumbers employ an impressive ballistic seed dispersal mechanism.

Arctic warms, polar bears switch diet: dolphins now on the menu

Known to feed mainly on seals, the images Jon Aars at the Norwegian Polar Institute captured of a polar bear dining on dolphins is a “culinary” first for the species. The photographs were taken in the Norwegian High Arctic, mid-April 2014. The bear was seen feeding on the carcass of one white-beaked dolphin, and covering another with snow.

Three dimensional printing goes metal: University of Twente researchers print copper and gold

The development of a method that would allow for metals to be used in 3D printing would open up a huge range of new possibilities, as the robustness and good thermal and electrical conductivity of metals lend well to a number of fields, such as microelectronics. A team from the University of Twente has developed a way to print 3D structures out of copper and gold, by using a pulsed laser to melt a thin film of metal and stacking the small droplets.

Study shakes answers out of the shaking disease: human prion immunity gene isolated

A recent study involving a Papua New Guinea tribe that practiced cannibalistic funeral customs sheds new light on prion-related conditions such as mad cow disease.

Green America: how to turn the power grid 100% eco friendly by 2050

Converting the power infrastructure to rely on clean, renewable energy seems like a daunting, expensive and some would say, unachievable task. But Mark Z. Jacobson, professor of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford, and his colleagues, including U.C. Berkeley researcher Mark Delucchi, are the first to outline how each of the 50 states can achieve such a transition by 2050.

Tanktastic: a brief overview of the modern-day knight in shining armour

We here at ZME Science aren’t very fond of war. We much rather prefer to drink beer in the shade and solve our differences with rock-paper-scissors. But we (meaning I) also think that tanks are really awesome. They embody so much of what humanity has learned over the millennia. From fire and mining used to forge the hulls of these behemoths, to gunpowder that sends a shell kilometers away to a point that we can calculate with equations that some of the brightest minds have made possible. We spent centuries learning how to build their beating hearts.