Animals, Biology, News

Scientists create the perfect music for cats

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We all know how therapeutic and soothing (or on the contrary, motivating) music can be; and we all know that different people like different types of music… so it seems safe to say that different animals also like different types of music. Now, a joint team of scientists and musicians believe they found how to compose the purr-fect music for animals, including monkeys and cats.

News, Renewable Energy

World’s first grid-connected wave power station switched on in Australia

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The world’s first grid-connected wave power station has just been activated off the coast of Australia. Taking energy directly from the waves and sending them to the grid is a remarkable achievement which will hopefully be replicated in Australia, as well as in other parts of the world.

Biology, News, Research

Scientists create see-through eggshell to reduce animal testing

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If you’ve ever wondered what happens inside an egg, then science has you covered – researchers have developed transparent artificial eggshells; but they didn’t do this just out of curiosity – they want to create a controlled environment for bird embryo growth and development to aid stem cell studies.

Animals, News, Science

The world’s most trafficked animal: the pangolin

The Cape pangolin, pictured here, could become increasingly imperiled if trade moves from Asia to Africa. Photo by: Maria Diekmann/Rare and Endangered Species Trust.

This gentle and secluded creature is called a pangolin. Bet you’ve never heard of him. It looks sort of like a walking pinecone, a dragon or a dinosaur. It’s tongue is as long as its body and can curl, then roll in a scaly ball. It’s a pretty amazing animal and it’s a shame so few people know of its existence. But more worrisome is that the pangolin might cease to existence entirely, with or without we knowing about it. Many believe it’s the most trafficked animal in the world.

Animals, Mind & Brain, News

Bees have false memories too – this might help explain how our own form

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Memories aren’t infallible – even for those with photographic memory – so, more often than not, they’ll seem fuzzy. And the older these get, the fuzzier they’re recalled. Mixing names, faces and events in your head can sometimes be embarrassing, but at least we’re not alone. Seems like bees have false memories too, according to a study made by British researchers at Queen Mary University of London. Previously, false memories had been induced in other animals, like mice, but this is the first time natural false memories have been shown to happen. Research like this might help us, in time, understand how false memories are formed and, in a more general sense, how we recall events.

Climate, Green Living, News

Ocean oscillation patterns explain global warming ‘hiatus’

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One of the prime arguments climate change skeptics throw about is how surface temperatures have remained more or less constant for the past 15 years, hence there is no man-made global warming – it’s all a sham, a conspiracy to keep scientists busy with gratuitous grants and fill Al Gore’s pockets. I’ve written previously about models and observations that explain

Great Pics, Health & Medicine, News

Bill Gates commissions Pro-vaccine artworks to remind us why immunization is important

Set in an 18th century English doctor’s surgery, this stunning portrait features Dr. Edward Jenner inoculating James Phipps, the first person to receive the smallpox vaccine. Dr. Jenner’s pioneering work in the late 18th century led to the eradication of smallpox in 1980. Alexia created and photographed the entire tableaux. The aristocratic woman in the center represents how smallpox did not discriminate, affecting the rich and poor alike. The many flowers throughout the piece symbolize the global impact of smallpox, and the skulls on every bottle the ephemeral nature of life and death.

Like most things in our modern day life style, we tend to take vaccines for granted. Some, in ever growing numbers, are on the contrary pushing and inciting against vaccination for all the wrong reasons. It’s easy to forget, however, that since their introduction hundreds of millions of lives have been spared. Vaccines given to infants and young children over