Environmental Issues, News, Science, World Problems

Just 1 in 10 Alpine Rivers still flow Today

Alpine river bank. Photo: Flickr

The Alps may seem like a paradise, but the environmental situation is extremely dire. Just one in ten rivers are healthy enough to maintain water supply and to cope with climate impacts according to a report by WWF. The study is the first ever to take a look at all the Alpine rivers. The choked rivers of the Alps Naturally,…

Materials, Nanotechnology, News

Researchers make 32 differently-shaped DNA crystals – is this the Future of Nanotech?

Researchers have achieved 32 different–shaped crystal structures using the DNA–brick self–assembly method. (Photo : Harvard's Wyss Institute)

A team at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering demonstrated the latest advances in programmable DNA self-assembly by crystallizing 32 structures with precisely prescribed depths and complex 3D features. The DNA crystals could potentially be used as the basis of a programmable material platform that would allow scientists to build extremely precise and complex structures rivaling the complexity of…

Animals, News, World Problems

Only Six Northern White Rhinos left in the World

Suni at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya.

Suni, a 37-year-old northern white rhino and only the second male of his kind left in the world, died recently of natural causes in the Ol Pejeta Conservancy reserve in Kenya. After his death merely six other specimens are now alive that still carry the legacy of this subspecies. Conservation efforts were heavily direct towards Suni, but now that the rhino is dead, all hope…

Biology, Diseases, Health & Medicine, News

How you get Ingrown Toenails, explained by Science

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Having a ingrown toenail could ruin your day and a lot after if you don’t have it fixed. Yet, even though ingrown nails and other nail-related conditions are common and pesky, very little is known about them. Now, a team at University of Nottingham have published a mathematical model that explains what forces are tugged beneath your finger nails and what exactly happens when…

Materials, News

This electric generator is only a few atoms thick

Positive and negative polarized charges are squeezed from a single layer of atoms, as it is being stretched. —Image courtesy of Lei Wang/Columbia Engineering

Researchers from Columbia Engineering and the Georgia Institute of Technology report the first experimental proof of piezoelectricity and the piezotronic effect in an atomically thin material, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), making the experimental setup, in effect, the thinnest electrical generator in the world. The resulting generator is optically transparent, extremely light, and very bendable and stretchable. In the future, such generators could be…

Biology, Health & Medicine, News

Paralyzed man Walks again after Nose Cells Transplant into the Spinal Chord

nose_cell

Regeneration of the spinal chord following a paralyzing injury was thought to be impossible, but groundbreaking efforts stirred by surgeons in Poland and Britain have turned this paradigm upside down. A team of dedicated surgeons and scientists transplanted  cells from the nasal cavity of a patient who had been paralyzed from the waist down for more than two years into…

Environment, Environmental Issues, News

The shortlist for the EEA’s photography competition

The long trip by Mariusz Warsinski

What does the environment mean to you? The European Environment Agency asked this question and invited photographers to have their take through a visual essay. Ducks floating along garbage; a lone, yet dominant windmill set on a twilight background; a small frog resting by the petals of a beautifully colored flower. Each artist shared an unique view of what the environment…

Psychology

Majority doesn’t always decide when it comes to teen drinking

The presence of a small minority of alcohol abstainers in groups of teen friends can help to decrease the likelihood that everyone else will get drunk and binge drink. Image via Science News.

Peer pressure doesn’t always drive teenagers to drink – in fact, it often goes the other way around, a new study shows. Having just one like-minded friend who doesn’t drink reduces instances of drunkenness among teen drinkers by 38 percent, a new study has shown. Criminologist Carter Rees, now at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, and sociologist Danielle Wallace of…

Diseases, News

The 1918 Spanish flu killed between 50 and 100 million people. This man is recreating it in a lab

h5n1-virus-01-1014-mdn

Yoshihiro Kawaoka has caused massive uproar in the scientific community when he announced he is attempting to recreate the world’s most lethal virus. Biologists are polarized on the issue, with some claiming that it is reckless, while others approving that it will help us better understand pandemics and how we can protect ourselves against them. Kawaoka is a veterinary researcher….

News, Renewable Energy

Lockheed Martin announces 10 year plan to reach cold fusion, scientists react with skepticism

Lockheed Martin fusion project leader Tom McGuire looks into the chamber of an experimental reactor.
Image credits: Lockheed Martin.

Lockheed Martin has officially entered the race to achieve nuclear fusion at room temperature on 15 October, laying out a 10-year roadmap to commercialize a reactor that would fit on the back of a lorry. The company has been working on the project for several years, but they’ve been extremely secretive about it until now, when they’ve released a grandiose plan…