New Caledonian crows can make tools from memory

The study suggests the crows learn by cultural transmission.

Chimps use dipping sticks to harvest water from tree holes. They’re the only ones that can reach the resource

Researchers say these chimps have a ‘drinking culture’.

Early human ancestors used their hands much in the way as we do

After analyzing key hand bone fragments from fossil records, a team of anthropologists conclude that pre-homo human ancestral species, such as Australopithecus africanus, used a hand posture very similar to that of modern humans. Considering fossil tools used for scrubbing off meat as old as 3.3 million years have been found, it may just be that our early ancestors weren’t all that different from good ol’ superior homo sapiens sapiens. Well, as far as hands go at least.

Stone tools evolved independent of ancient African cultures

A breakthrough finding in Armenia where thousands of ancient cutting tools were found beautifully preserved casts doubt on a currently prevailing hypothesis that these were solely invented in Africa. The tools discovered are between 325,000 and 335,000 years old. The age suggests the ancient paleolithic cultures of the time that inhabited the region independently developed the sophisticated technique to produce them.

Early modern humans were culturally diverse before leaving Africa

Early modern human populations were culturally diverse and sometimes exchanged tools helped by river networks in a then savanna rich Sahara, according to the biggest ever comparative study of stone tools dating to between 130,000 and 75,000 years ago. At least fourdistinct populations, each relatively isolated from each other, have been identified as possessing distinct cultural practices.

Gorilla mother uses makeshift ladder to help her young climb an obstacle [PHOTO]

While chimpanzees, which are our closest relatives sharing 98% of our genetic blueprint, are notorious for their widespread tool use, the same can’t be said about gorillas. The great apes have only been caught twice by researchers engaged in tool use. One used a stick to explore the depth of a muddy river and another turned a tree trunk to