Elements

Science not only involves a lot of technical know-how, but also a great deal of creativity and imagination. Often science and art are seen as opposites, which can’t be further from the truth. Worst case, they complement each other. For one, art may actually be the best way to communicate science to those who have yet to take a class or lacked an inspired influence in its due time. Take for instance Kaycie Dunlap‘s graduate thesis called Elements – Experiments in Character Design. For her project Kaycie decided to make us of her passion for character design to give chemistry a more humane look. So she ambitiously sketched by hand a witty character for every 112 chemical elements from the period table.

Hydrogen

For some elements, Kaycie was inspired by her friends, while others were inspired by celebrities. For instance, Freddy Mercury is showcased for Mercury.

Helium

“An artist from birth, I was the kid who drew in a class all the time. This phase perpetuated well into art school – where it was actually OK to draw in class! As senior year approached, they encouraged us to come up with an idea for our thesis that combined everything we’d learned at school and gave insight as to who we were and what inspired us. Drawn in pencil and colored in Photoshop, I took my first love – characters – and combined it with a strong idea to create these 112 illustrations,” Kaycie wrote on BoredPanda.

Lithium

 

Kaycie is now working on linking all these characters under a common story, which might turn into a comic or even an animation.

Berilium

boron

Carbon

Nitrogen

oxygen

flourine

neon

Sodium

Magnesium

Aluminium

Silicon

Phosphorus

Sulfur

chlorine

argon

Potassium

Calcium

scandium

Titanium

Vanadium

Chromium

Manganese

Iron

cobalt

Nickel

Copper

zinc

Gallium

Germanium

Arsenic

Selenium

Bromine

Krypton

Rubidium

Strontium

YTTRIUM

zirconiumniobium

Molybdenum

technetium

Ruthenium

Rhodium

Palladium

Silver

Cadmium

Indium

Tin

Antimony

TeluriumIodine

Xenon

Caesium

Barium

Lanthanum

Cerium

Praseodymium

Neodymium

Promethium

Samarium

Europium

Gadolinium

Terbium

Dysprosium

holmium

Erbium

Thulium

YTTERBIUM

Lutetium

hafnium

Tantalum

Tungsten

Rhenium

osmium

Iridium

Platinum

Gold

Mercury

Thallium

Lead

Bismuth

Polonium

Astatine

Radon

Francium

Radium

Actinium

Thorium

Protactinium

Uranium

Neptunium

Plutonium

Americium

Curium

Berkelium

Californium

Einsteinium

Fermium

Mendelevium

Nobelium

Lawrencium

Rutherfordium

Dubnium

Seaborgium

Bohrium

Hassium

Meitnerium

Darmstadtium

Roentgenium

Copernicium

The remaining six elements from the periodic table which haven’t been illustrated (yet) are Ununtrium, Flerovium, Ununpentium, Livermorium, Ununseptium, Ununonctium.

If you’d like these in print, Kaycie turned her project into a deck of flash cards.  Each card includes an element image on the front and its atomic weight, density, and fun fact on the back. You can order your own deck for $35.

 

 

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