My thoughts are my password, because my brain reactions are unique

Your brain is an inexhaustible source of secure passwords – but you might not have to remember anything.

The most popular hacked passwords of 2015. My god…

The most popular? The old classic “123456”. Next, “password”. *facepalm.

Hard to crack and easy to remember password? Try a poem

“Please enter a strong password”, is now an ubiquitous greeting whenever we try to register online. Security experts advise we use long passwords at least 12 characters in length, which should include numbers, symbols, capital letters, and lower-case letters. Most websites nowadays force you to enter a password under some or all of these conditions. Moreover, the password shouldn’t contain dictionary words and combinations of dictionary words. Common substitution like “h0use” instead of “house” are also not recommended – these naive attempts will fool no automated hacking algorithm. So, what we end up at the end is a very strong password, like the website kindly asked (or forced) us to do. At the same time, it’s damn difficult if not impossible to remember. People end up endlessly hitting “recover password” or, far worse, write down their passwords in email or other notes on their computer which can easily be recovered by any novice hacker.