Animals, Anthropology, News

Chimps Pass down Skills to Peers and Establish Cultures

chimp_culture

Chimps, our closest relatives, can pass down knowledge and skills, like using a new tool for instance, and establish cultural communities, according to a recently study published in PLOS Biology. Communicating and passing down skills, inventions and knowledge is considering a pre-requisite to what we commonly refer to as human culture, and the findings suggest that this kind of behavior can

Animals, Biology, News

Sharks have Social Personalities too: some are friendlier than Others

Juvenile spotted cat sharks (Scyliorhinus canicula) were studied for their social interactions. They can found throughout the northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean, but during the test the sharks were monitored in large tanks containing three habitats in Plymouth. Photo: University of Florida

When people think of sharks, the most immediate response might be jaws, fright or blood, but if you’re willing to set prejudice aside you might find that these animals aren’t that different from most of us; at least in one important respect: social interactions.

Environment, News

Beautiful Undulating Clouds officially recognized as a New type of Cloud Formation

Asperatus Cloud, New Zealand. Photo: Merrick Davies

Different types of clouds form under different circumstances, although they all originate from the same process: the condensation of water. Though most people would categorize clouds as either fluffy, dark or scary, there are actually many types of clouds classified according to the height they form at and texture. Weather geeks have a reason to rejoice today, as a new

News, Renewable Energy, Technology

Near Perfect Solar absorbing Material developed at MIT

Cross section of the metallic dielectric photonic crystal. Image: MIT

Researchers at MIT report they’ve developed a novel material that can absorb almost all incoming wavelengths of light and convert the energy into heat. The radiated heat emitted by the material can then be collected by photovoltaics for later conversion into electricity. The material is cheap to make using currently available manufacturing processes, can absorb light indifferent of the incident

Art, Feature Post, Renewable Energy

Solar Hourglass might power 1,000 Danish Homes while inspiring Climate Change Action

LANI

Every year, the Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI) in Copenhagen welcomes renowned designers and engineers to submit designs that integrates renewable energy in harmony with citizens, nature, and the urban environment. This year’s winning entry is a fantastic solar power array that takes the form of a hourglass, unveiled by Argentina-based designer Santiago Muros Cortés. The project, if constructed, would power 1,000 Danish

News, Renewable Energy

The UK’s First Floating Solar Farm Unveiled in Berkshire

Image via the Guardian.

The UK’s first floating solar farm has been unveiled in Berkshire; the array features 800 photovoltaic panels and has a capacity of 200W. The project cost £250,000 ($405,400) and has been installed on a reservoir at Sheeplands Farm near Wargrave. Solar energy provides many advantages, but also raises many problems. Among those problems is land area – whenever you use an

Animals, Biology, News

Dolphins can sense the Earth’s Magnetic Field

Bottle nose dolphins navigate using the magnetic field. Image via Deviantart, Animal Photos.

As if dolphins weren’t special enough, scientists have added another quality to the list: they can sense our planet’s magnetic field. A surprising variety of animals can sense the Earth’s magnetic field – bees, birds, salmon, frogs, sea turtles, salamanders, lobsters, and rodents; now, you can also add dolphins to that list. French researchers have shown that, just like some of

Climate, News

Australia’s 2013 Heat Waves linked to Man-made Climate Change, 5 Studies Conclude

GOVERNMENT OF AUSTRALIA

Australia went through two almost unbearable consecutive summers. Of course, Australia is a naturally hot country, but the temperatures were extremely high even for them. Record temperatures were recorded and heat waves swept throughout the entire country. Now, five separate studies published today conclude that the blazing summers can be blamed on man-made climate change. Sizzling Hot The January 2014 southeastern

Animals, Feature Post

Antivenom: how it’s made and why it’s so precious

snake_antivenom

Every year some 100,000 people die all over the world after being bitten by a venomous snake. Depending on the toxicity of the venom and how much venom is injected inside the body, a snakebite will cause  tingling, muscle weakness, nausea swallowing difficulties, excess saliva and potentially fatal breathing problems. To avoid getting killed, a snakebite victim must immediately go

Environment, News, World Problems

Global Wildlife Populations Down by 50% in just 40 Years

lpr2014_cover_front_1

Global wildlife populations have decreased by more than half, concludes a new report released by the WWF. The extent of this major destruction came as a shock and showed just how far we are from reaching a sustainable future and living in harmony with the Earth’s biodiversity. Losing Biodiversity The report shows that the worst loss happened in freshwater species