Paleontologists find ‘incredibly rare’ 52 million year-old fossilized berry

Geoscientists working in South America have uncovered an ancient berry.

Fossil Friday: the first dino brain (we’ve ever found)

We didn’t even think it was possible to find one up to now.

#FossilFriday: The scent of a 54-million-year-old insect

An ancient pheromone spray.

Fossil Friday: the earliest known shells from 809 million years ago

Shifting ocean chemistry and predatory pressure made organisms bunker up for the first time.

Fossil Friday: the bug inside the lizard inside the snake

Always go for a meal before you fossilize.

Fossil Friday: C. Megalodon, the true Jaws

The biggest fish in the pond.

#FossilFriday: opalized belemnite

Belemnites were extinct cephalopods with a squid-like body.

Fossil Friday: Sciurumimus albersdoerferi, the single-fossil theropod

There’s only one fossil of this dinosaur that we ever found — and you’re looking at it.

#FossilFriday: Geode Fossil

This is a beautiful geodized fossil – a sea snail fossil filled up by a yellowish calcite geode. The fossil is part of the Busycon genus – a genus of large, generally edible sea snails. These snails are commonly known in the United States as whelks or Busycon whelks. This fossil was reportedly taken from the Anastasia Formation in Florida, USA — a

Fossil friday: Platycrinus saffordi, the sea lily

Though they’re known as sea lilies, crinoids are animals not plants. Think of them as starfish-on-a-stick: they are filter-feeding sea floor echinoderms, and relatively common as fossils go. Crinoids as a group aren’t extinct, but are relatively uncommon in modern oceans.