Scientists override fear response in humans using artificial intelligence and hard cash

Researchers think this method could help patients with PTSD and phobias.

DeepMind can now learn how to use its memories, apply knowledge to new tasks

The AI developed by Alphabet, Google’s parent company, just received a new and powerful update.

This is the first pop song written by an A.I. and it sounds a lot like The Beatles

You can dance to it. Who said robots were boring?

How artificial intelligence will augment the typical North American city of 2030

Fifteen years from now in a North American suburb.

Scientists quantify human intelligence for first time ever using MRI scans

A particular pattern in the human brain is connected to higher levels of intelligence.

Robot lawyers helps challenge 160,000 parking tickets

Getting back from lunch to find a parking ticket can ruin your day, especially if you think you did nothing wrong.

MIT makes an AI that can predict what the future looks and sounds like

Artificial intelligence is learning in seconds what took humans a lifetime to master.

Google scientists propose adding a ‘kill switch’ for A.I.

When in danger of A.I. overlords, press the big red button.

Artificial intelligence should be protected by human rights, Oxford mathematician argues

While robotics and AI research is taking massive strides forward, our social development hasn’t really kept up with them.

Google’s AI is now writing post-modern poetry. I’ve read worse

Despite these tentative first steps definitely look like a work in progress, don’t look so stunned when you’ll learn about the first best-selling novel written by a robot (I’ve seen worse things published). It all starts now.

MIT made an A.I. that detects 85 percent of cyber attacks

Security analysts rely on all sorts of automated software that spots suspicious activity. Even so, an analyst has to churn through even thousands of false positives on a daily basis, which makes it easy to miss a cyber attack. Coming to their rescue is MIT which reports an artificial intelligence ‘tutored’ by the best human experts can identify 85 percent of incoming attacks. Most importantly, it’s not confined to a certain set of attack patterns and learns to adapt with each new attack.

Microsoft’s new A.I. writes captions for images (and it’s hilarious)

We tested Microsoft’s CaptionBot and had some laughs.

IBM has a creepy patent that’s a search engine for your memory

How cool would it be to solve most of your personal problems like you’d use google. “Where’s my keys?” or “What meds did the vet say I should give my cat?”. Well, be careful what you wish for, because there’s a reason a personal search engine doesn’t exist yet: it can only work if you’re under surveillance 24/7. Or .. at least when you’re awake.

Artificial Intelligence: teaching a robot to have human values

Artificial Intelligence. To most of us that brings up images and short clips from movies where AI dominates Earth and enslaves us poor humans. Put away those connotations for a moment. AI in its purest sense, where programs evolve and self-improve has been very interesting. Google recently showcased an interesting program; they plugged it into a game on the PS4, and in a matter of hours, the program had taught itself to play the game, and a few hours later could play it better than any human. Although this is slightly frightening, it shows how powerful technology is getting.

Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg invested in the ultimate AI

A newly founded artificial intelligence lab, called Vicarious, wants to build the world’s first, unified artificial intelligence that can match human intelligence. This is not the first time we’ve heard companies or universities trumpet such ambitious goals, but considering who’s backing the project I can only entertain the possibility Vicarious might just do it. Entrepreneurs with great vision and a track record of backing successful companies have all hopped aboard, like Elon Musk (SpaceX, Tesla), Mark Zuckerberg (Facebook), Peter Thiel (Paypal, founder of venture capital and hedge funds worth billions), Jerry Yang (Yahoo! founder), Jeff Bezos (Amazon founder) and more.

AI scored on par with a four-year old

Despite decades worth of research, unbelievable computing power and sophisticated algorithms, one of today’s best artificial intelligence can’t score better than a four year old on a standard IQ test.

AI passes math test like an average high-school student

Researchers from the University of Washington and the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence (AI2) have developed a computer software that scored 49% on high-school geometry SAT tests – an average score for a human, but a great one for current AIs.

Neural network image processor tells you what’s going in your pictures

Facial recognition and motion tracking is already old news. The next level is describing what you do or what’s going on – for now only in still pictures. Meet NeuralTalk, a deep learning image processing algorithm developed by Stanford engineers which uses processes similar to those used by the human brain to decipher and interpret photos. The software can easily describe, for instance, a band of people dressed up as zombies. It’s remarkably effective and freaking creepy at the same time.

Killer AI? Let’s Solve the Smaller Problems First

Tesla Motors’ Elon Musk has said that our civilization is dangerously close to encountering AI problems within a “five-year timeframe, 10 years at most.” He made the comment on the website Edge.org shortly before deleting it. His point was that, sometime soon, we may actually create a form of artificial intelligence that decides to rise up and wipe out the

When robots are everywhere, what will humans be good for?

This question was prompted to Ray Kurzweil – well known futurologist, pioneer of the Singularity Movement and Director of Engineering at Google – by a member of the audience during a Q&A session at an Executive Program hosted at Singularity University last October. You might not give it much thought now, but the truth is half of all American jobs could be replaced by robots in just a couple of decades. If you’re a teller, supermarket cashier, call center operator or even a famer, you’ll likely lose your job in the coming decades. So, what’s to do then? Should we all rally and ban robots? It’s no easy topic, but at the same time it’s important, I think, not to panic. We need to remember that this isn’t the first time something like this happened. It’s the old human vs automation problem. How many millions of jobs were lost to mass production in the late XIXth century? How many more once computers started permeating society? At the same time, new jobs were made. Just look at where the information industry is today. The major challenge is not if new jobs can be made. This isn’t really problem. The real challenge is to make these available at the right pace and make sure people have the necessary resources to repurpose their skill set. I’ll leave you to Ray.