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I am sorry to break it to you, but you can never truly kiss anyone. But hey, It’s not your fault! This is a consequence of the fact that two atoms can never really touch each other.

Wait, what?

Push them together as hard as you want, and they will resist.

Two like charges always repel each other. And also no two objects can have the same exact properties ( courtesy of the Pauli’s exclusion principle ). This curtails any possibility of two objects coming together.

This also means that from an atomic perspective. you can never really touch anything and that chair you think you are sitting on, you are actually hovering over it!

 

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This goes beyond our intuition because we know it when we have kissed someone. That adrenaline rush and the dopamine surge is just inevitable! You feel it, yet not touch?

Atoms love to Share.

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You might have heard about bonds in Chemistry. Well, as it turns although atoms don’t like getting close to one other, they are completely okay with sharing! Hmm..

The Grandeur of touch

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If we can’t really touch anything, how can we explain the perception of touch?

This is where it gets astonishing. The answer boils down to how our brains interpret the physical world.

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What your brain is perceiving as touch is merely the electron’s repulsive force.

A legion of atoms and molecules collectively known as your skin are interacting with a surface. The repulsive force they experience is being sent to the brain which then interprets the data as touch!

The sensation of touch is arguably a Grand Illusion, created as a way of interpreting interactions between electrons and electromagnetic fields

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The profundity of nature

It is of quintessence to realize that these are constraints of nature and not some man-made voodoo. This is how the laws of nature have been laid.

We are all merely spectators to Nature’s endeavors.

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