Hydraulic Filters

Hydraulic Filters

Most people may not be aware that for an engine to work at its peak performance, the lubricants used to keep the parts aligned and wet need to be free of any contaminants. There have been studies pointing out that 75% of all fluid engine or mechanical failures can be linked to issues involving contamination. This is what filters are designed to prevent; to remove particles that are not supposed to be part of the fluid. There are many different kinds, too, so it is imperative that you choose the kind that is designed for your particular needs. You can get Hydraulic Filters from many UK companys so lets see what the different types I so you can be informed.

Bag Filters

bag filters

The most common type of filter is a bag filter. This consists (usually) of a cloth (or synthetic material) bag that the hydraulic fluid is pushed through, which then catches all of the solid contaminants, as they get caught in the filter. These types of filters are most common in cars and trucks. They are usually very inexpensive and easy to clean or change.

Screen Filters

screen-filters

screen-filters

Screen filters are similar to bag filters, except very fine wires are used. These are then woven together, much like fabric is, to create a metallic cloth. Because wires are used instead of cloth, the engineers can make the filter as porous as the job and the expect size of contaminants require.

Magnetic Filters

Magnetic Filters

Magnetic Filters

The final type of filter, magnetic, use specially charged plates, which have been magnetized. Any metals that have become entrapped in the fluid will be picked up and held by these types of filters, though it doesn’t prevent dirt and other non-metallic particles from still contaminating the fluids. Filter Construction

Filter Construction

Filter Construction

When you choose the type of filter you need, you will also need to know if the filter has its own housing or if it can be installed as is. There are also different alignment options that each filter has. The most popular option is called in-line alignment, which allows the inlet and the outlet valves to sync up directly with the filter. The opposite type of alignment, called off-line, means the filter is not part of the hydraulic system’s main loops. Another design is called the duplex alignment.

This type is used to be able to change the filters while the system is still online and working, and consists of two different filter types combined together. The final alignment type is called a return-line system, and is needed when the filter must capture any and all contaminants within the hydraulic system, before they cause any damage to the working parts. You will also need to know the maximum flow rate allowance and pressure type that your particular engine requires, as getting the wrong one can cause the filter to lose its performance quicker. The last thing you’ll need to know are the port valve sizes of both the inlet and outlet, as these require a precise fit when the hydraulic fluid system is connected to the filter.

Ratings

Most filters have ratings, which measure how effective they are at screening out contaminants. A standard code, the ISO 4406, measures how many contaminants are present in the oil. The lower the cleanliness rating, the better the filter is at removing particles. Filters also have a beta ratio (measuring the size differential between particles above the filter and those below). With the beta ratio, the higher the number is, the better the filter is.

Enjoyed this article? Join 40,000+ subscribers to the ZME Science newsletter. Subscribe now!

Estimate my solar savings!