Today, on the 3rd Monday of January, ZME Science pays homage to the man that was Martin Luther King, being grateful for all his lifetime achievements. Also, it’s not hard at all to observe how much today’s world would need a man of his calibre.

He was an African American. He was an activist, and a pastor. He was the youngest man to ever receive the Nobel prize, which would mark just a small triumph in his work. He dedicated his whole life to ending racism and racial segregation, and his plead for non violent ways changed the world in a way that few truly did.

Still, his work was left unfinished, because he was assasinated in 1968. Today, he would have been 80 years old. I wouldn’t want to say even this little about him, because the huge popularity he enjoys today makes him known throughout the world and especially in the USA, and you probably know the very basics I told you, but it can’t hurt. As I’m writing this, I’m asking you to take a moment and think about him, think about what he stood for, and how he would feel about the world today. Think about that. Please.

We leave you with a few Martin Luther King quotes, which will remain in our lives as tiny sparks, that carry his light.

All labor that uplifts humanity has dignity and importance and should be undertaken with painstaking excellence.

At the center of non-violence stands the principle of love.

A lie cannot live.

A man who won’t die for something is not fit to live.

Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.

Freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed.

Life’s most persistent and urgent question is, ‘What are you doing for others?’

Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.

One of the greatest casualties of the war in Vietnam is the Great Society… shot down on the battlefield of Vietnam.

Mister Martin Luther King, you are missed.

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