James Lovelock: Humans are too stupid to prevent climate change

James Lovelock is one of the world’s most brilliant minds alive at the moment; he developed numerous technologies for NASA, and currently dedicates most of his efforts to the environment and futurism. He is largely known for the development of the Gaia Hypothetis. Well, according to the man… we’re just too stupid to prevent climate change. Anyway, I won’t go

Lightning in super slow motion

While I was browsing around youtube, I came across this particular video which just blew my mind. It’s pretty much what it says on the cover, so here it is.

The LHC is on the threshold of new territory

It’s always thrilling when CERN releases an update on what they’ve been doing, and this time is no different. It’s even better because it often forces me to look up different terms, which I’m not familiar with. This time it was a unit called “barn” (check out the wikipedia explanation). So, it’s speculated that the LHC will go down for

Charles Darwin and the tree of life

This is in fact the 5th part of a series you can find uploaded by this user, but I find that even by itself, it explains the major aspects of evolution in plain language and with great detail and talent; narrated by David Attenborough.

Additional evidence of water activity on moon as ice is found on the North Pole

Employing the help of the Mini-SAR instrument (a lightweight, synthetic aperture radar), NASA managed to find more than 40 craters covered with ice. Despite the fact that the craters are relatively small, it’s estimated that there is about 600 million metric tons in that area. “The emerging picture from the multiple measurements and resulting data of the instruments on lunar

The periodic table welcomes its new member: Copernicium

Copernicium is now officialy the newest and heaviest element in the periodic table, with an atomic number of 112 (which means that it has 112 protons in its nucleus); it’s also 277 times heavier than hydrogen. Named after astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus, it follows a long tradition of naming elements after famous scientists; some of the latest in this line include

The biggest tsunami ever recorded was taller than 500 meters

On the night of July 9, 1958, an earthquake struck Fairweather Fault in the Alaska Panhandle. The result was that about 30.6 million cubic meters of rock were loosened, being thrown from a height of 914 meters down onto the water mass. Here’s a picture so that you can get a perspective on what that means: The impact generated a

Temple Grandin: A TED talk about authism

I found this TED talk a while back, and found it really interesting. Long story short, some of the most brilliant minds in the world would probably be diagnosed as authistic today. The world needs this kind of people, they’re the kind of people that can make leaps, and can solve problems people (even brilliant people) with a normal way

Cano Cristales – the world’s most colourful river

CaƱo Cristales is a river located in Northern Columbia, with a length of almost 100 km and a width of under 20 meters. If you look at it, you’d be tempted to think this is some sort of illusion or photographic trick, but you’d be wrong. It’s quite remote, and you can get there only by foot, horses and donkeys,

Do you want access to important scientific articles? Support Science Commons

First of all, let me say that we are not associated in anyway with Science Commons (although we’d really like that, heh). I just think their initiative is logical and it should succeed. Find the details on their website.

Science ABC: the eddy currents, and the coolest video you’ll see today

Eddy currents are electrical phenomena that take place when a conductor is exposed to an oscilation of the magnetic field due to the relative motion of the field source and conductor; rewind. You have a conductor, say a copper tube, and a magnet. One moves relative to the other and you’ve got current (basically a circulating flow of electrons). These

6 geographical facts you’re not going to believe

Our world is a strange and awesome place – but some things are just hard to believe! Here are some of the most spectacular ones:

Vancouver 2010: probably the greenest Olympics ever

Well I have to say, I’m really thrilled about the Winter Olympics that have just started, and even though they don’t get as much hype as the Summer Olympics, they still attract tens of millions viewers (or even more). It’s also really great to see they’re being held in a city like Vancouver. Why am I saying this ? Because

Amazingly long fish filmed

Mark Benfield from Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge was undertaking a survey when he spotted this amazing oarfish at about 10 meters long. The fish is one of the longest in the world, and it’s general aspect resembles that of a serpent, so it’s possible it lies at the basis of some sea serpent myths. Professor Benfield explains how they

Hell’s gate

If a gate to hell existed, I bet this is how it would look like. Locals from the town of Darvaz in Uzbekistan were really inspired when they named it this way. When looking at the pictures, you’d be tempted to think this is some sort of a volcano or magma-related process, but it’s not. Geologists are actually responsible (they

Underwater… lakes !

Boy I’ve gotta tell you, my jaw really dropped when I heard this one. There are actual lakes, on the bottom of oceans, especially in the Gulf of Mexico region; they’ve got their own shores and all. The brine water of these lakes actually hosts unique wildlife, creating an absolutely amazing environment. The fact that these are brine water means

Giant squids take to California

Yes ladies and gents, giant squids are all over the California beaches. Each of the squids weighs about 40 pounds, but some of them reach 60 and even more than that. I haven’t been able to find out what’s up with them, or why they gathered in such numbers, but according to scientists, this happens almost periodically, though they cannot

Ten billion dollars pledged for vaccines

Yesterday, Bill Gates officially announced he will donate 10 billlion dollars for a 10 year effort to boost vaccination against infectious diseases in developing countries. The investment is estimated to save almost 9.000.000 certain deaths, along with a significant health improvement. I won’t get into more details, which if you want you can find on nature (among others), but I

Busting 8 of the weirdest science myths

Well you’ve probably all seen the Myth Busters. I’ve watched some episodes and loved most of them, so I’m hoping I can give them a hand. I haven’t watched all the episodes so if they (or anybody else) already took care of these myths well… oh well. The duck’s quack doesn’t echo This is one of the most quacky myths

How much area would be required to power the world (with solar panels alone)

I came across this particular pic which really made me think. I don’t know if they did the math right, but if they did, with a surface as big as the plastic island floating around in the Pacific covered with solar panels, the whole world could be powered. If we consider other sources of clean energy (hydro plants for example),