Amazing NASA pic shows how galaxies collide

I gotta say, this is one of the most beautiful pictures I’ve seen all year ! This amazing image released by NASA shows a collision betweet two galaxies that began 100 million years ago (when dinosaurs were still kings) and is still happening today. The bright sources you see are in fact produced by huge amounts of material that falls

Stanislav Petrov – the man who probably saved the world

It was September 26, 1983. The Cold War was at one of its most tense periods ever. With the United States and Russia being bitter enemies, they had already built enough nuclear weapons to destroy each other – as well as the whole world a couple times over, for that matter –  and the slightest sign of an attack would

Ship floating on sulphur hexafluoride

This short fun demonstration shows how a boat model can float on a gas that is significantly denser than air.

The oldest dildo could come from the Stone Age

Sex toys have definitely come a long way these past years, but as it turns out, they’re probably not as modern as you’d be tempted to think. Last week, an object carved out of antler bone was excavated from Sweden and it made archaeologists scratch their head quite a lot… and chuckle: the object has an unmistakable look of a penis. Although

Spend a month at the science and industry museum of Chicago

I have to say, this is one of the most attractive initiatives I’ve come across in quite a while. Basically, you live in the museum and breathe science for 30 days, and if you do that, you win 10.000$ and a lot of other prizes. That’s pretty much awesome if you ask me. You can apply here. From their page:

8 surreal natural landscapes

The Wave, Arizona The Wave is an astonishing sandstone formation that fascinates photographers and attracts numerous hikers every year. It formed in the early Jurassic (190 million years ago) when dinosaurs ruled the Earth and compacted through the years, calcifying in vertical and horizontal layers. The lovely curves we see today are a result of erosion by wind and rain.  

Richard Feynman explains the key to science in just over a minute

Richard Feynman is one of the men I admire the most. Here’s just 63 seconds in which he manages to catch the very essence of science.

Water balloons in 0 gravity

Aside from looking just awesome, these tests should also give new insights on water in 0 gravity and furthermore, inspire the new generation of space explorers.

NASA Picture of the oil spill

I’m gonna call ‘no comment’ on this one. Full pic here.

Everest clean up team goes up again

Everest is known as many things; first of all it’s the highest point in Asia, and in the world. It’s perhaps the peak over 8000 meters that most people try to climb (due to obvious reasons); but it also kills. Despite not being the most dangerous peak on the face of the earth, it has killed over 300 people since

Complete Neanderthal genome sequenced

Yes ladies and gents, researchers have produced the whole genome sequence of the 3 billion “letters” (nucleotides) in the Neanderthalian genome, and the results are interesting to say the least. For starters, up to 2 percent of present day human DNA outside of Africa originated in Neanderthals; this result suggests that the Neanderthals, Homo neanderthalensis diverged from the same primate

World’s biggest beaver dam can be seen from space

The biggest beaver dam is (get ready folks), twice as long as the Hoover dam, measuring 2,790 ft (over 800 meters; in fact, it’s so big that you can even see it from space. Though it may seem pointless for the tiny critters to build, they actually build the dams for a good purpose: the goal is to design a

Simulation of a black hole eating a star

Finland on track to offer high speed internet to all its inhabitants

Finland is definitely one of the countries leading the technological development in numerous fields; the latest in their plans is to offer high speed internet to ALL of its inhabitants by no later than 2015. “The target set by the government will be reached on schedule, or even ahead of it,” the ministry said in a statement. The government plans

Health insurers are major investers in fast foods

According to a recent study published by the American Journal of Public Health, health insurers are among the top investors in major fast food chains. Ironically, these companies invest nearly 2 billion dollars per year in companies closely linked with heart and vasculary diseases. “The insurance industry, so far as it seeks to make a profit, it does so in

The big picture on Icelandic eruption

Eyjafjallajökull (how ever you pronounce) is a volcano located in Iceland, covered by a small glacier with the same name. It’s crater has a diameter of about 3-4 kilometers, and it erupted the second time this month, causing a cloud of ash that forced authorities to stop almost all flights above Iceland. The problem, when you have such a volcano,

Obama sets Mars goal for America in less than 20 years

Barack Obama came out and said that it should be possible for NASA to send astronauts to Mars and bring them back safely by the mid 2030s. The US president said this while explaining the details of his plans with the US space agency at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Mister Obama has set quite some high goals for

Puma replaces shoe box with reusable bags

I had some serious thought on whether to write this or not. It’s not a paid post or anything, and quite frankly, I’ve never owned anything from Puma. But I was absolutely thrilled to find out about their initiative to replace the shoe boxes with reusable bags. It’s exactly this kind of small thing, but that requires minimum efforts that

The April awesome animal award goes to THE SIBERIAN SALAMANDER

There are so many things we have yet to understand about the animal kingdom it makes you wonder how much we know about it after all. Therefore, ZME Science will present to you one animal each month; one animal that really makes yo go “what ?!”. There’s no connection to the month itself, no order whatsoever. In March, it was

LHC – we have a collision !

“It’s a great day to be a particle physicist,” said CERN director general Rolf Heuer. “A lot of people have waited a long time for this moment.” The LHC had been going on a promising streak for quite a while now; however, the encountered problems (mostly engineering, but also physics) were huge. Imagine firing arrows on the face of the