Geopicture of the Week: Graben in Iran

Geopicture of the Week: Graben in Iran

A graben in Iran. Image via Structural Geo. In geology, grabens are depressed blocks of land bordered by parallel faults. In German, "graben" means trench or ditch,...

GeoPicture of the Week: Fresh Crater on Mars

GeoPicture of the Week: Fresh Crater on Mars

This jaw-dropping image was taken by High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera aboard NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter in the Sirenum Fossae region of Mars. This impact crater appears relatively recent as...

Clinoptilolite-Ca

Geopicture of the Week: Clinoptilolite

Photo: Volker Betz’s Photo Gallery Clinoptilolite is a natural zeolite comprising a microporous arrangement of silica and alumina tetrahedra. These zeolite crystals form when volcanic molten...

GeoPicture of the Week: Strengite

GeoPicture of the Week: Strengite

Image via Imgur. Strengite is a rare mineral, named after Johann August Streng, a professor of Mineralogy at University of Giessen, Germany, in the late 1800s. Streng was an...

GeoPicture of the Week: Pyromorphite

GeoPicture of the Week: Pyromorphite

Pyromorphite. Image via AW Minerals. Pyromorphite is as awesome as it sounds. The mineral is composed of lead chlorophosphate: Pb5(PO4)3Cl, sometimes occurring in sufficient abundance to be...

carminite mineral

GeoPicture of the Week: Carminite

Carminite. Image via imgur. It's been a while since we posted a mineral for our #GeoPicture section, and now we're back with a special one: carminite....

CLIMATE STRIKE
ZME Science is supporting and participating in the September 2019 Climate Strike.

Our planet is burning up. Throughout Earth’s history, the planetary climate has varied substantially over geologic time -- but this time, it’s different.

There is unequivocal scientific evidence that our emissions of greenhouse gases (most notably CO2 but also methane and others) are fueling this heating and without strong and timely measures, the damage will be catastrophic.

We are already approximately 1 °C (1.62 F) above pre-industrial levels. Limiting the heating to 2 °C (or even better, 1.5 °C) is mandatory if we want to prevent irreversible, catastrophic damage to the environment, to our society, and potentially to ourselves as a species. This would require sustained global action from all the world’s countries -- and this is just not happening.

The science is in. We know the cause of the problem, and we know how to fix it. All that’s required now is the political and social impetus to bring forth these healthy changes. If we continue with “business as usual”, we will be the ones responsible for unprecedented disasters. We have to do more to ensure a sustainable, low carbon transition. We owe it to this planet, we owe it to ourselves, and we owe it to our children.

Today, ZME Science will not be publishing any new stories. We will be highlighting scientific evidence on climate change and what can be done to limit it.We hope you will join us in the quest for building a better world for ourselves and future generations.

Thank you!
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