#FossilFriday: Pyritized Ammonite

#FossilFriday: Pyritized Ammonite

This is a heavily pyritized Pleuroceras ammonite fossil collected near Forcheim, Germany. The fossil is approximately 185 million years old, from the Jurassic (the Pliensbachian stage). Naturally the color is much duller but...

#FossilFriday: A fossilized log

#FossilFriday: A fossilized log

It's not just animals that get fossilized, trees can become amazing fossils as well, and here we have a great example. Log fossilization  is the result of a tree or...

#FossilFriday: A crazy large Spider Fossil

#FossilFriday: A crazy large Spider Fossil

*Photo : © Janelle Weaver for National Geographic News This is the largest spider fossil ever found: Mongolarachne jurassica. Mongolarachne is an extinct genus of spider which lived...

#FossilFriday: Pyritized Ammonite

#FossilFriday: Pyritized Ammonite

What we're seeing here is an ammonite fossil. Ammonites are an extinct group of marine invertebrate animals which were basically ubiquitous throughout the Mesozoic, but went extinct after it. Finding an...

Fossil Friday: Ammonitic Chaos!

Fossil Friday: Ammonitic Chaos!

What is going on in this picture? Here, we see a lot of Promicroceras, early Jurassic ammonites. Ammonites are an extinct group of marine invertebrate animals which lived from the Devonian until...

Fossil Friday – Fossilized beetle

Fossil Friday – Fossilized beetle

Yes ladies and gents, we're starting a new feature! I'm such a sucker for geology, that just one weekly feature doesn't seem enough. I know, I know, I've kind of been...

CLIMATE STRIKE
ZME Science is supporting and participating in the September 2019 Climate Strike.

Our planet is burning up. Throughout Earth’s history, the planetary climate has varied substantially over geologic time -- but this time, it’s different.

There is unequivocal scientific evidence that our emissions of greenhouse gases (most notably CO2 but also methane and others) are fueling this heating and without strong and timely measures, the damage will be catastrophic.

We are already approximately 1 °C (1.62 F) above pre-industrial levels. Limiting the heating to 2 °C (or even better, 1.5 °C) is mandatory if we want to prevent irreversible, catastrophic damage to the environment, to our society, and potentially to ourselves as a species. This would require sustained global action from all the world’s countries -- and this is just not happening.

The science is in. We know the cause of the problem, and we know how to fix it. All that’s required now is the political and social impetus to bring forth these healthy changes. If we continue with “business as usual”, we will be the ones responsible for unprecedented disasters. We have to do more to ensure a sustainable, low carbon transition. We owe it to this planet, we owe it to ourselves, and we owe it to our children.

Today, ZME Science will not be publishing any new stories. We will be highlighting scientific evidence on climate change and what can be done to limit it.We hope you will join us in the quest for building a better world for ourselves and future generations.

Thank you!
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