Fossil Friday: Zaphrentis phrygia

Fossil Friday: Zaphrentis phrygia

Kinda looks like the Sarlacc, doesn't it? Well take your geek hat off cause it isn't a sarlacc. Now put your paleontology geek hats on because this is Fossil Friday...

Fossil Friday: Dicranurus monstrosus

Fossil Friday: Dicranurus monstrosus

When a species almost one hundred times bigger than you, who has access to nukes and can go to space, discovers your remains a few million years after you die...

Fossil Friday: Helicoprion

Fossil Friday: Helicoprion

Helicoprion is an extinct genus of shark-like, cartilaginous fish that lived from the early Permian (~290 m.y. ago) all through to the massive Permian-Triassic extinction episode (roughly 250 m.y. ago.)

FossilFriday: Ammonite Growth Chambers

FossilFriday: Ammonite Growth Chambers

Ammonite fossils are among the most common in the world, with their characteristic shape and chambered shell. But did you ever wonder what the deal is with those chambers? [caption...

#FossilFriday: Dunkleosteus

#FossilFriday: Dunkleosteus

via Imgur. Dunkleosteus is an extinct placoderm fish that lived some 380 to 360 million years ago, during the late Devonian. It's called a "placoderm" because...

#Fossil Friday: Ordovician Edrioasteroidea

#Fossil Friday: Ordovician Edrioasteroidea

The fossil comes from the Bellevue formation in Ohio. Image via Wiki Commons This is Streptaster vorticellatus, a member of the Edrioasteroidea class. The Edrioasteroidea is an extinct class of...

Fossil Friday: Opalized belemnite

Fossil Friday: Opalized belemnite

Belemnites are an extinct order of cephalopods ("cephalo" meaning head and "pod" meaning leg) that lived during the Mesozoic era, some 200 to 65 million years ago. They were elongated...

#FossilFriday: Ancient Fern

#FossilFriday: Ancient Fern

Image via Wiki Commons. This is a fossilized Phegopteris guyottii - a species of fern. Its genus still exists today and is known collectively as the...

Fossil Friday: Zhenyuanlong

Fossil Friday: Zhenyuanlong

Image via Wikipedia. This magnificent creature is Zhenyuanlong, a genus of dinosaur related to the velociraptor. Living approximately 125 million years ago, this specimen left behind a...

Fossil Friday: Mesozoic Dragonfly

Fossil Friday: Mesozoic Dragonfly

Image via Fossil Mail. This is Parahemiphlebia - a dragonfly that lived over 100 million years ago, in the Cretaceous, and was contemporary with T-Rex and the...

#FossilFriday: Cut in half Pyritized Ammonite

#FossilFriday: Cut in half Pyritized Ammonite

I really love pyritized ammonites - they're such a spectacular sight (as you can see both here and here) - but this one is really interesting and different. [caption id="attachment_37440"...

CLIMATE STRIKE
ZME Science is supporting and participating in the September 2019 Climate Strike.

Our planet is burning up. Throughout Earth’s history, the planetary climate has varied substantially over geologic time -- but this time, it’s different.

There is unequivocal scientific evidence that our emissions of greenhouse gases (most notably CO2 but also methane and others) are fueling this heating and without strong and timely measures, the damage will be catastrophic.

We are already approximately 1 °C (1.62 F) above pre-industrial levels. Limiting the heating to 2 °C (or even better, 1.5 °C) is mandatory if we want to prevent irreversible, catastrophic damage to the environment, to our society, and potentially to ourselves as a species. This would require sustained global action from all the world’s countries -- and this is just not happening.

The science is in. We know the cause of the problem, and we know how to fix it. All that’s required now is the political and social impetus to bring forth these healthy changes. If we continue with “business as usual”, we will be the ones responsible for unprecedented disasters. We have to do more to ensure a sustainable, low carbon transition. We owe it to this planet, we owe it to ourselves, and we owe it to our children.

Today, ZME Science will not be publishing any new stories. We will be highlighting scientific evidence on climate change and what can be done to limit it.We hope you will join us in the quest for building a better world for ourselves and future generations.

Thank you!
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