Dolphins hang out in cliques

It seems we keep finding out more and more interesting facts about dolphins, the fantastic creatures highlighting a not-so-pleasant but rather human behavior: much like sassy highschool girls, dolphins hang out in cliques. Discriminating dolphins Dolphins have figured out how to use sea sponges as hunting tools – which is an absolutely remarkable feat in itself. Mothers who develop this

Avian flu jumps from birds to mammals, killing New England baby seals

A novel avian influenza virus has developed the ability to infect aquatic mammals and is responsible for an outbreak of fatal pneumonia that recently struck harbor seals in New England. The announcement was made by researchers from the Center for Infection & Immunity (CII) at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association, New England

Sea bird becomes ‘superbird’ on camera – dives 50 meters underwater in 40 seconds

A camera attached to a South American seabird allowed scientists to directly observe its dive-and-feed techniques for the first time. The video below explains this exact process, and it’s absolutely stunning! Researchers from the Wildlife Conservation Society mounted a small camera on the back of an imperial cormorant in Punta León, a coastal protected area in Argentine Patagonia. The imperial

National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Solar Has The Most Potential Of Any Renewable Energy Source

A recent study of gargantuan proportions estimated that the technical potential of photovoltaic cells and concentrated solar power (CSP) in the United States, at today’s level of research and with today’s possibilities, is enough to generate about 400,000 TWh of energy annually, significantly more than any other renewable energy source. The study The National Energy Laboratory (NREL) routinely estimates the

Aluminum might be the future’s eco-fuel of choice

If you’re reading ZME Science from home, chances are that you’ve got a can of beer or soda in someplace handy, and you’ll probably throw the can away after you finish your drink, hopefully in a designated recycling bin. What if I told you that the aluminum from your soda can could be used to power your car? Before you yell rubbish,

Antarctic rift the size of the Grand Canyon speeds ice sheet melting

Scientists from Britain have found a remote ice rift valley, up to one mile deep, under the ice in Antarctica. The rift is similar in size and depth to the Grand Canyon and because it is direct contact with the warming ocean, it’s been found that it has a significant contribution to the unusual ice sheet melting of West Antarctica. The rift

Termite workers suicide to protect colony from invaders. Remarkable social behavior

Defense, like offence, is expensive for any animal. It takes resources and a lot of energy, and for some, it even comes at an ultimate sacrifice. Such is the case of a species of termite found in the rainforests of French Guiana. There, worker termites, after they age and are no longer capable of serving the colony at their full potential,

Snake missing link found: it crawled by T-Rex

Researchers have discovered what they believe to be a grandfather of snakes, which descended from terrestrial rather than marine ancestors. “It’s the missing-link snake between snakes and lizards,” says Nicholas Longrich, a postdoctoral fellow in the geology and geophysics department at Yale University and the lead author of a paper published in the journal Nature. The paper argues that snakes

Biodiversity in tropical forests is declining, despite protection

Biodiversity helps keep the world’s ecosystem in balance, and if threatened, it could bring forth destabilization leading to a chain reaction of events, mostly irreversible. Crops would fail, pests and viral infections might surface, CO2 retention might decrease and more – basically, the Earth will have a tougher time fending for itself if its biodiversity is in peril, and consequently the planet

Greenland’s entire ice sheet experiencing melting – unprecedented event in 30 years

During just four days, from July 8 to July 12, Greenland‘s total ice sheet surface subjected to melting rose from 40% to a whooping 97%. Basically the whole Greenland ice sheet was melting during this time frame. According to NASA, a situation similar to this mid-July phenomenon hasn’t been ever recorded in the three decades of satellite observations. Now, melting

Polar bears interbred with brown bears during warmer climate

A new research has found after analyzing the genomes of polar bears and brown bears that the two species interbred, after the two species split some 5 million years ago, during periods of warmer climate. Recent evidence suggests this is happening today as well, as an effect of global warming. The team of scientists from Pennsylvania State University and the University

4 Super Environmentally Friendly Houses in the UK

Malator in Druidstone, Wales Touted as an architectural masterpiece, contemporary houses don’t come as cool looking as this capsule embedded in the ground. From the outside it looks like a pod from a sci-fi movie, and the same goes for the interior. It’s turf roof, steel chimney and peephole doorway gave it the nickname ‘ Teletubby house’ from the locals.

Promiscuous dumpling squid has a short life expectancy due to excessive mating

Squids and cephalopods, in general, might not be the sexiest animals out there, but their mating systems are quite interesting,

Iceberg twice the size of Manhattan breaks off Greenland glacier

Researchers at the University of Delaware and the Canadian Ice Service recently reported that an ice island, whose surface is twice that of Manhattan, broke off from Greenland’s Petermann Glacier, one of the two largest glaciers left in Greenland connecting the great Greenland ice sheet with the ocean via a floating ice shelf. The 46-square-mile giant iceberg broke off from the glacier on

Snow leopard mother and cub den caught for first time on tape [VIDEOS]

Magnificently beautiful, the elusive snow leopard is a large cat native to the mountain ranges of Central Asia. Adapted to living in high altitudes, deep in the mountains, and preferring typically inaccessible areas for humans as their dens, has made snow leopards extremely hard to spot, and more importantly keep track off, since it’s an endangered species. Actually, just until recently,

The July Awesome Animal Award goes to: The Sea Swallow

A while ago, we started this animal award, giving the first one to the mimic octopus, and the second one to the amazing Siberian salamander, which can survive after being frozen in temperatures as low as -45 degrees Celsius. Each month, we’ll highlight an animal so special and unique it just makes you go ‘Wow!’. This month it’s the living

One in 1.6 million chance of this summer’s heat wave happening without global warming

A raging issue at the moment, in both government bureaus and bar chats alike, is global warming. Is it just a natural occurring event, part of the Earth’s climate cycle or, indeed, human-induced? Most scientists have repeatedly claimed, backed by scientific evidence, that the ever rising global temperature levels, along with various calamities sparked by a chain reaction, are primarily due to human intervention.

US electricity demand could be 80% supplied by renewable sources by 2050

According to a recently publicized rapport by the  Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), renewable energy sources could account for as much as 80% of the US’s electricity demand by 2050. The rapport signals the various difficulties that need to be overcome to reach this goal, and note that while 80% might be very challenging to reach, a 50% reach

Most precise climate change predictions have L.A. area heating up by 4-5 degrees by mid-century

A groundbreaking climate change study,  which contains data 2,500 times more detailed than previous studies, predicts weather patterns from 2041 to 2060 in the Los Angeles region. Findings show that the region is expected to heat by an average of 4 to 5 degrees Fahrenheit by the middle of this century. This implies tripling the number of extremely hot days (temperatures above

Why Cheetahs can outrun any other fast paced animal

The cheetah is the Bugatti Veyron of the animal kingdom, capable of reaching speeds as high as 29m/s (65mph). Actually, in a 0 to 60 mph race, most cars would have a hard time in out-pacing the fastest land animal in the world. How does the cheetah manage to outstrip all its other animal contenders, even those which have a similar stride,