Hubble captures the death of a star, offering a glimpse of our sun’s final days

A spectacular image captured by the Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) gives us a glimpse into how the Sun will look at its death.

The entire Universe in one Logarithmic Map

Don’t you just love it when art and science get together? Here, artist Pablo Carlos Budassi managed what seems impossible: representing the entire Universe in one picture. Using lots and lots of telescope, satellite images and photos snapped from NASA’s rovers, he painstakingly stitched many of the prominent features in the known Universe. He started from our solar system and then moved on in

AstroPicture of the Week: Black Hole and Galaxy

  NGC 5195 and the Whirlpool Galaxy comprise one of the most noted interacting galaxy pairs in astronomy. The two galaxies are connected by a dust-rich tidal bridge. The dust in this tidal bridge can be seen silhouetted against the center of NGC 5195. This demonstrates that NGC 5195 appears to lie behind the Whirlpool Galaxy.

AstroPicture of the Day: North Korea highlighted by its own darkness

Can you find the border?   A Nasa Earth Observatory spokesman said at the time the picture was taken: ‘North Korea is almost completely dark compared to neighboring South Korea and China. The darkened land appears as if it were a patch of water joining the Yellow Sea to the Sea of Japan. Its capital city, Pyongyang, appears like a small

AstroPicture of the Day: Geminids of the South

I know, I know, we recently posted another AstroPicture… but I can’t help it if there’s too much space awesomeness! Here, the annual Geminid meteor shower did not disappoint, peaking before dawn on December 14 as the Earth plowed through dust from active asteroid 3200 Phaethon.   ADVERTISEMENT This image, captured in the southern hemisphere by (Carnegie Las Campanas Observatory, TWAN) and published

New Horizons images suggest Pluto is geologically active

NASA released a stunningly colorful new image of the dwarf planet Pluto, the latest in a series of images that steadily trickle down from the New Horizons probe since it left the solar system this July. And it’s not only eye candy either; the features this picture reveals has left the smart guys at the agency scratching their heads.

Meteor strikes Thailand twice in 3 months

  The first (seen in the first animation) took place on September 7 and the second one on the November 2. People though these were some planes crashing, but were later confirmed to be small meteor showers. ADVERTISEMENT Just so you know, this happens all the time in our atmosphere and there is nothing to be alarmed about. Albeit, legion of

AstroPicture of the Day: Clouds, as seen from above

We generally look at clouds from below, but thanks to this lovely picture from the International Space Station, we also get amazing views like this one. Notice the shades from the clouds stretching for miles and miles.

Astropicture of the Week: Pluto

We’ve seen Pluto in all its splendor recently thanks to the New Horizons mission that flew by the former planet / currently planetoid, but just when you thought it can’t surprise you anymore… something like this comes along. This is Pluto. ADVERTISEMENT Recently, a paper was published based on the data that New Horizons sent back to Earth, including impressions

Looking at the universe naked – an Ontological Awakening

It was Stephen Hawking who said:

We are just an advanced breed of monkeys on a minor planet of a very average star. But we can understand the universe. That’s what makes us special.