Artistic infection: hand cut paper microbes and pathogens

We’re always in contact with microbes, but we’re not always happy about it. However, I have a feeling that these hand-cut microbes are an exception. Artist Rogan Brown just completed work on his latest paper artwork titled Outbreak, a piece he describes as an exploration “of the microbiological sublime.” It took him over four months to develop these intricate sculptures,

The Amazing art of Istvan Orosz

If you look at this drawing, it seems like a normal (maybe a bit old school) depiction of a shipwreck. But when you put a cylindrical mirror in its center, you end up with a picture of Jules Verne. Holy mother of all techniques! I have no idea how you would do a thing like that, but it doesn’t seem

12 Insightful Climate Change Cartoons that put Things into Perspective

Last month, the Niels Bugge Cartoon Award asked illustrators and cartoonists from around the world to submit drawings based on a basic theme: climate. Oceans are in our hands,” they proclaimed, and participants from all around the world put forth their best interpretations (often satyrical) of the current climate situation. You can check their website to see who won, but I

Help NASA pick the lunar reconnaisance orbiter’s best moon image

NASA wants the public (read – YOU) to pick the best moon image ever taken by the reconnaisance orbiter. They have settled the finals between 5 different pictures, and you get to vote which one wins. The winner will be the cover of a special image collection. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) is a NASA robotic spacecraft currently orbiting the Moon

A timeline chart of SciFi predictions that eventually became true

I pride myself as being a science fiction buff. Asimov, Clark, Wells, Jules Verne – we’ve all come to love these classics. What makes people so fond of science fiction, though? One may argue that it’s these novel’s uncanny ability to dwell the human mind into uncharted areas, all while keeping everything in a realm of feasibility. You’ll find some

Surreal artistic anatomical/botanical collages

It’s not often that we at ZME Science post art. However, every once in a while, we like to indulge ourselves in the finer pleasures of life – especially when we come across something like this! This is truly the most spectacular art I’ve seen in a while. Travis Bedel aka bedelgeuse is a mixed media artist that specializes on creating anatomical collages from

Using famous paintings to study Earth’s past atmosphere

When it comes to studying the Earth’s atmosphere and pollution, paintings are not really where you usually go to gather information. But team of Greek and German researchers suggest that colors of sunsets painted by famous artists can offer clues about our planet’s past atmosphere. They mainly focused on paintings that depicted ash and gas emitted from a volcanic eruption.

Scientists model for awesome 2014 pin-up calendar

When you think about calendars, scientists are pretty much the last thing that comes to mind – models, animals, cars, or landscapes usually fill that role. But just for moment picture a climate scientist in a slinky red dress and high heels, brandishing a fire extinguisher as she tries in vain to save the last remaining trees from a forest

The mental illness monsters: artist visualizes diseases as mythological creatures

An artist has come up with a very innovative way of making mental illnesses more beatable and rallying the sufferer’s spirit against something tangible: he drew some of the most common conditions as mythological monsters. Toby Allen, a Cornish artist drew anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, social anxiety, avoidant personality disorder, borderline personality disorder, paranoia and dissociative identity disorder. ‘The artwork is

Stanford scientists build a ‘brain stethoscope’ to turn seizures into music

“My initial interest was an artistic one at heart, but, surprisingly, we could instantly differentiate seizure activity from non-seizure states with just our ears,” Chafe said. “It was like turning a radio dial from a static-filled station to a clear one.” When Chris Chafe and Josef Parvizi from Stanford University began transforming recordings of brain activity into music, they had