Mimicry in the wild: what is it and how it works

Mimicry is defined as “the act, practice, or art of mimicking”.

The Brain in 3D for the first time

For the first time in modern history, researchers have managed to reconstruct a three dimensional circuit of connected cells in the brain, thus offering insight in how it works; the model, which was built using microscopes and a supercomputer offers a novel insight and an unprecedented opportunity to discover how the complex mechanism of the brain “navigates”, pretty much the

How would you respond to being touched by a robotic nurse ?

To be touched by a careful nurse, and to feel taken care of is very important, and often neglected; having that sense of comfort and tranquility might just be what gives that extra boost to the patient. Touching patients can lead to a numerous of responses, from calmness to discomfort, from intimacy to even aggression. But how would people react

Two hours worth of gaming is like snorting a line of coke…therapist says

It’s ignorance like this that never sees to baffle me. Steve Pop is an overnight notorious psychotherapist who, like most of today’s center stage and tomorrow’s props, became famous after stating live on BBC Radio that “spending two hours on a game station is equivalent to taking a line of cocaine in the high it produces in the brain.” “It’s the

Kaspar the friendly robot – helping autistic children smile

Pictured on the left is Eden Sawczenko, an autistic four year girl from Stevenage, that has had a lot of problems bonding with other children, not being able to understand emotions and actually frawining upon them. Her best friend in the world is Kaspar, a very friendly human-like, child-sized robot built by scientists from University of Hertfordshire specifically to help

Remotely Controlling Neurons: Using Nanoparticle Actuators to Remotely Activate Neural Tissue (or, “Why Standing in Front of a Microwave Whilst Possessing Nanoparticles in your Brain is a Bad Idea.”)

Neuroscientists are always looking for new and interesting ways to manipulate individual neurons and neural networks– shooting magnetic waves at our brains may be the best route yet.

I take thee…Cocaine

Of all drugs, cocaine creates the greatest psychological dependence, because it stimulates key pleasure centers within the brain and causes extremely heightened euphoria. Drugs like this mess with the brain’s circuitry and hijack the reward system. Cocaine cravings are said to be so strong that just the memory of the feelings associated with use of the drug trigger the desire

Powerful new painkiller with no side effects could be just one year away

Unfortunately, pretty much every human being with access to medical care has taken some sort of painkillers at some point – unfortunately because of the reason; but painkillers don’t make the pain signal go away. What happens is the signal still goes to the brain, but the opiates such as morphine alter the way the brain “understands” it, and as

Complex simplicity is the best for music

Art and science almost always seem to be standing at opposite seats of the table, so it’s really hard to explain one through the means of the other. But if we were to look at some of the best compositions in the world, music that transcended time and delighted generations and generations, what would we find ? According to a

Woman with no fear intrigues researchers

Courage is not the absence of fear, but being afraid and facing it; for a 44 year old woman who is referred to “SM” for privacy reasons, that is not an option – she can not feel fear, biologically. Researchers have tried and tried with their best techniques to scare her, but there was absolutely no result. Haunted houses, monsters,

New imaging method reveals stunning methods of brain connections

The typical healthy human brain contains about 200 billion nerve cells, called neurons, all of which are connected through hundreds of trillions of small connections called synapses. One single neuron can lead to up to 10.000 synapses with other neurons, according to Stephen Smith, PhD, professor of molecular and cellular physiology. Along with a team of researchers from the Stanford

New ways to detect Alzheimer found

Alzheimer is one of the nastiest diseases you can get; it is a degenerative disease that affects your brain cells, and as far as we know, the best way to prevent it is by being mentally active throughout your life. The most recent study conducted about it takes a look at ways of detecting the disease in its initial stages.

Cognitive Research

  For some reason, people are a bit reluctant to believe the things neuroscientists are telling them. Things such as bar graphs or data just to not appeal to them, especially when they try to dig inside your brain. So scientists tried to find a way to make the people believe them and believe it or not, the solution was